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Full text of "Pilgrim"


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THE PILGRIM 



Volume XII 



Plymouth, Mass., June, 1933 



No. I 



Published this year as a Senior Year Book 



1932 THE PILGRIM STAFF 1933 

Editor-in-Chief _..____-- :. . . Loretta Smith 

Literary Editor - ' - Florence Armstrong 

Assistant Literary Editor --------- Shirley Dutton 

Business Manager - Kenneth Tingley 

Assistant Business Manager .----.... Gilbert Andrews 

Boys' Athletics - - - Enzo Bongiovanni 

Girls' Athletics - Ruby Johnson 

Art - - Margaret Whiting 

Exchange Editor - - Jane Matheson 

Assistant Exchange Editor - ... Leroy Shreiber 

French Editor - EVELYN JOHNS 

Latin Editor Iris Albertini 

Alumni Editor - Miriam Gifford 

Joke Editor - William Brewster 

Assistant Joke Editor - William McPhail 

School News Editor - Marjorie Belcher 

Assistant School News Editor - - •■ Harvey Barke 

Feature Editor ----- Dorothy Testoni 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



COMMENCEMENT PAGE 
History of Class of 1938 - 4 

Parting Shots ----- .------..5 

Last Will and Testament ------_-____ j_g 

Class of '33 Movie Review .-- ....17 

Class Poem --------------- is 

Class Prophecy -------------- 19 

Our Song Album -------------- 21 

Favorite Sayings of Our Teachers ----------- 21 

LITERATURE 

Wanted — An Explanation ------------ 22 

On Jig-Saw Puzzles ------------- 23 

At The Eleventh Hour ------------- 23 

Work of the Storm ------------- 24 

Dishes ---------------- 24 

Willett Rainer Snow Reconnoiters ---------- 25 

Treasures --------------- 25 

The Old Maid Turns ------- - - - - - 25 

And We Scoffed -------------- 26 

A Message To Tell ------------- 27 

The Blessed Toiler - -------- 27 

Sans Cents ------ ...-__.__ 27 

Well, I'll Be— -------------- 27 

The Hands of Time ------- .... 28 

Embarkation ---------------28 

The Epoch Maker -------------- 29 

What a Night! ------------- 2 9 

The Lake --------- - . 30 

On Cape Cod - - - - - 30 

UNDER THE WHITE CUPOLA ------ - - - 31 

ATHLETICS ------------ - 33 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

French - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -37 

Foreign Exchange -..----------38 

Latin ----- - 39 

CLASS SONG — The Last Chord - - - 41 

ALUMNI NOTES - 42 

MEBBE IT'S PERSONAL WE'RE GETTING - - 43 

EXCHANGES ----- 44 

THE ORACLE - - - - - 45 

MICKEY MOUSE " 47 

. 48 
JOKES „ - . o „ - - « - *s 



THE PILGRIM 



(Elans nf 1933 



THE PILGRIM 



I 



THE PAST 



CLASS HISTORY 

I 

PVEN though loquacity and garrulity- 
are common, there has been, and is, 
no person who can, or who will, tell us 
the why and wherefore of certain irre- 
fragabilities. This being so, it has never 
been explained why, on that momen- 
tous and auspicious afternoon in Sep- 
tember, 1929, the entrance of a goodly 
number of Freshmen within the portals 
of the Plymouth High School was not 
more widely and more fittingly ac- 
claimed. 

It being absolutely and undeniably 
essential that the glory cast on the deeds 
of our predecessors should not exceed 
that of our class, the Freshmen, imme- 
diately upon their arrival, set about 
establishing a foothold in the shifting 
sands of Reputation. 

The presentation of interesting, as 
well as instructive, assembly programs 
won distinction and great praise from 
all who saw them, and most pleasing 
to our ears were those oft-repeated 
words at a football game, "Put in the 
Freshmen! We want the Freshmen!" 
for even in those early days, the brawny 
athletes of the Class of '33 were well- 
known and recognized by the fans as 
players of great promise. 

When faced by a problem of finance, 
we were undaunted, and as a result of 
deliberation and careful planning, sev- 
eral successful dances were conducted. 

The Freshmen were also well repre- 
sented in the subsequent issues of 
"The Pilgrim" and at the Voodoo 
Minstrel Night, which was a school 
project. 

Thus were the first steps of the long 
climb achieved and our first year in 
High School passed happily and pros- 
perously leaving us only pleasant mem- 



ories. 



II 



And so it happened that, when we be- 
came associated with the upperclass- 
men, we were called Sophomores and 
entered on our second year in High 
School, little expecting to meet so close- 
ly, tragedy, which stalked twice into the 
midst of our fun and gayety and took 
from us two of our classmates, 
Florence Fraser, during the second year 
and Marjorie Lafayette, who died in the 
summer of her Junior year. 

This was the last Sophomore Class to 
be introduced to the intricacies of the 
French language by Miss Ruth Baker, 



for it was during our Junior year that 
Miss Doris Carey began her work as a 
French teacher in Plymouth. 

Not to be outdone by members of the 
faculty who presented "Adam and Eva" 
to the theatre-goers of Plymouth, sev- 
eral Sophomores, dramatically inclined, 
joined other members of the school in 
the production of "It Pays to Adver- 
tise." 

June brought us to the close of an- 
other year and through the first half of 
our Plymouth High School career. 
Ill 

As was expected, when we became 
Juniors, the subject of a class ring was 
of prime importance. Accordingly, after 
long interviews with several salesmen, 
and weeks of doubt and hesitancy on 
the part of the committee, several rings 
were chosen from which the class se- 
lected the one that was to become the 
Class of '33 ring. 

The Junior Press Club, under the 
direction of Miss Humphrey, kept the 
papers supplied with news of school ac- 
tivities. 

The Junior Prom was a success, 
financially and socially. 

Joe Querze organized the "Little 
Symphony" and brought cheer to many 
since he furnished music for our basket- 
ball games. 

During this year, "Daniel Boone" 
was presented. It was an outstanding 
success, and a goodly number of the 
cast were Juniors. 

Again Dame Fortune smiled benig- 
nantly on the Class of '33, and made our 
Junior year a round of successful pro- 
jects and pleasant memories. 
IV 

We, entered our Senior Year, elated, 
perhaps a bit inflated at our sudden rise 
to such lofty heights, but before many 
weeks passed, "'Tis true, 'tis pity, and 
pity 'tis 'tis true," we discovered, much 
to our chagrin, that we were still mere 
pupils. 

Encouraged by a successful dance, 
several Seniors aided in the production 
of the Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, 
"Pirates of Penzance," while Loretta 
Smith, Alvin Borgeson, Geno Ferri, 
and Howard Sherman, turning to legiti- 
mate drama, took part in the Class Play, 
"The Valiant." 

Those people who attended football, 
basketball, or baseball games in which 
school teams played will acknowledge 
the sportsmanship and good work of 
those Seniors who were members of 
the teams. 

(Continued on page 17) 



THE PILGRIM 



PARTING 



LEAH ALBERGHINI 



Five feet tall, 
Petite and small, 
And Judy says, 
"And that's not all." 



IRIS ALBERTINI 

There's music in the swaying 

bow, 
This lady'll play wherever 

she'll go, 
She also wrote the Symphony 
For the class of '33. 



ROSE ALDROVANDI 

Rose has several beaux, 

Her supply is by no means 
scanty, 

But it seems she has a favor- 
ite, 

The gentleman's name is 
Anti. 



IRENE BALBONI 

The pirates now once more 

hold sway 
As in the days of yore, 
For "Samuel" is on his way, 
A pirate at her door. 



ROBERT BARTLETT 

Bob has hair which you'll 

agree 
To be of lightest hue, 
Each girl's ambition is to be 
Possessor of his "queue." 



ELIO BARAFAULDI 

Kere's an interesting chap, 
He's never very busy, 
But, Elio, please tell us 
What you'd do without that 
"Lizzie". 



SHOTS 

WILBERT BEAUREGARD 

He's pleasingly indifferent 
To all the maidens fair, 
Perhaps he doesn't like 

them — 
Or maybe doesn't "dare". 



HELEN BEEVER 

Our "Tid" is a jolly sport, 

She has a taking way, 

So watch your step, male 

sex, 
She'll break a heart some 

day.. 



GEORGE BELL 

Now, George, we're sure you 

know 
That it really is a sin 
To keep Room 10 awaiting so 
While you come straggling 



MILTON BERG 

"Bergie" is a quiet lad, 
A fact he won't disguise, 
He's going to be a doctor, 
And a good one, we surmise. 



ADOVA BERGAMINI 

Oh, how this lady studies her 

books, 
Long on her wisdom, long on 

her looks — 
We think of her always in 

terms of her charms, 
A number of papers and 

books in her arms. 



ELLA BERNAGOZZI 

A perfect little dancer! 
Some day, if you keep on, 
A prize cup you'll be winning 
In some future marathon. 



THE PILGRIM 



GILBERT BESSE 



"Gilly" tries to kid the fair 

sex, 
Makes them think he doesn't 

care, 
We've found out from other 

sources 
That he favors yellow hair. 



ENZO BONGIOVANNI 

Co-Captain Bongiovanni, 
(Who can spell his name?) 
He's the high school "Gable" 
And he'll beat him at his 
game. 



ALVIN BORGESON 

Through this year's Senior 

Project 
Our class learned something 

new, 
And we've decided, "Borgie", 
Dramatic honors go to you. 



STANFORD BOWERS 

'Tis said that in a ball-room 
He rates an even A, 
But then again in studies 
He's not so good, they say. 



JOHN BRADFORD 

What a sheik! — oh me, oh 

my, 
Tall and lanky and lean, 
Girls all sigh when he rides 

by 
In his red, wire-wheeled 

machine. 



VICTORIA BREWER 

To artistic persons 
"Vic's" always a friend, 
Anywhere, anytime, 
A helping hand she'll lend. 




GUY BRIGIDA 

Just an old Chevy, 
But boy, can it go! 
When he's out to see "Evy" 
Does he travel slow? 



CHARLOTTE BURGESS 

Here's a girl that's very 

quiet, 
With studies as her daily 

diet, 
They say she has no thought 

for men — 
But we suggest she think 

again. 

FRANCES BURGESS 

Frances goes to White Horse 

summers, 
She and "Scottie", that's her 

pup, 
With a girl like Frances on 

it, 
White Horse Beach is all 

dressed up. 



NANDO BUSSOLARI 

Nando plays in football 
And basketball, as well, 
But what he does outside of 

that 
"Happy" perhaps will tell. 



PAULINE CALLAHAN 

You must have loads of 

trouble 
With that curly, flying hair, 
But still, if we could have 

those curls, 
We'd cherish them with care. 



JOHN CANNING 

You have often heard 
Of "dancing feet", 
Johnny's got 'em, 
He's hard to beat. 



THE PILGRIM 



FRANK CAPELLA 

Up yonder in a village 
Just beyond South Street, 
"Cappy" holds his interviews, 
And any friend will greet. 



MARGORIE CASSIDY 

No manly heart gives her 

a thrill, 
No one to make her say, "I 

will," 
But she keeps dates, you 

ought to know, 
With Shakespeare, Byron, 

Keats, and Poe. 



NORMA CASWELL 

Norma is a quiet lass 
So attentive in her class, 
Most industrious in her 

work, 
A girl who's never known to 

shirk. 



MILO CAVICCHI 

He has a cottage at Billing- 
ton 

And almost lives up there, 

He rides by in a big green 
car 

In a hurry to get somewhere. 



LEONORA CECCARELLI 

Sits in a corner 
All by herself, 
Sweet Leonora 
A shy little elf. 



HAZEL CLARK 

Tiny's her name, 
Short and cute, 
Anyone larger 
Is always a "brute". 





' > 














i t j, 



CLIFTON COBB 

We'd all like to have money, 
A fact we won't conceal: 
But it's a different kind of 

'Cash" 
To him that can appeal. 



ADELE COHAN 

Our Adele does like the boys, 
She's far from a beginner. 
But how we wish that she 

would use 
Her lipstick a little thinner. 



PRISCILLA COLLINS 

We have often heard of 

people 
Who talk a "mile a minute," 
If entered in a contest, 
Priscilla'd surely win it. 



HILTON CROWELL 

Hilton comes from Manomet, 
A shy, retiring boy, 
We think it's very safe to bet 
That no one he'll annoy. 



WARREN DAVIS 

Why the sad youth over 

there 
Standing by yon door? 
We've been told he darsd look 

twice 
At a pretty sophomore. 



ROSA DESLAURIERS 

Rosa's in for every sport, 
There's nothing she can't do, 
And in the town of Bridge- 
water 
There's a lad to whom she's 
true. 



THE PILGRIM 



FLORENCE DONAVAN 

At basketball games or 
dances, 

'Twould be something very- 
rare 

If "someone" looking for her 

Couldn't find "Flossie" there. 



CHARLOTTE EDDY 

She doesn't mix with girl 

friends, 
The same goes for the boys, 
And that is why we wonder 
What constitute her joys. 



PETER FERIOLI 

Pete — the heartbreaker! 
Pete — the sheik! 
Why is it girls throw them- 
selves 
At his feet? 



GENO FERRI 

Ferri has a good voice 
For crooning to the moon, 
But, when he's singing to his 

"choice", 
He says time flies too soon. 



FERDINAND FIOCCHI 

Fiocchi's quite a ladies' man, 
In this he just rejoices, 
And how these ladies listen 
When he, his opinion voices! 



AURA FORTINI 

To outward appearances 
This lady's sedate, 
But, if given the chance, 
As a comedian she'd rate. 



FRANK FORTINI 

Buzzy, busy all the day, 
Takes time out for foolish 

Play, 
And it's he we often see, 
Talking to Bruna Gambini. 



BRUNA GAMBINI 

She always looks most prim 

and fair, 
As she talks to Lenu, 
We hope another loving pair 
Will not end up in Reno. 



PETER GELLAR 

Pete, the football hero, 
Awoke with heart afire, 
Now he's playing "Nero" — 
We ask you, where's the 
lyre? 



FRED GERETY 

He may seem shy 
And bashful, too, 
But get him "going" 
And watch out, you! 



MIRIAM GIFFORD 

There's a certain Bailey lad 
Who makes her heart so very 

glad 
That frequently in history 

class 
Their secret notes they're 

known to pass. 



WARREN GIRARD 

"Wanny's" so good-looking, 
He's seen at every dance, 
He teases girls outrageously 
And holds 'em in a trance. 



THE PILGRIM 



FRED GODDARD 

"A quiet lad," his friends all 
say 

As he gees about from day to 
day, 

But he always has a ready 
reason 

When his work is out of sea- 
son. 



CHARLES GAVONI 

Charley wants some night 

clubs 
To manage without care, 
But every time there's shoot 

ing, 
They'll say, "Sharley, vas you 

dere?" 



IOLANDA GAVONI 

"Got something to tell you, 

Io," 
We hear it every morn, 
For it's "Io this," and "Io 

that" 
Till noon, almost from dawn. 



JOHN GAVONI 

John Gavoni (or "Pro" to 

you) 
What is it that he likes to 

do? 
Oh, yes, to write or read a 

book, 
But best of all he likes to 

cook. 



NORMA GAVONI 

The real "art" of smiling 
Is what we all need, 
This being the case, 
Norma's sure to succeed. 



ARTHUR GUIDDETTI 



Watch him, girls, and do be- 
ware ! 
He's not so tall 
But though he's small, 
He's quite a woman slayer. 



EDITH HALBERG 

"Edie's" quite a singer, 

But to hear her we must go 

To her church on Sunday 



morning 

Where her 

o'erflow. 



bird-like notes 



ADELE HALEY 

This girl is tall and very thin, 

Where she leaves off the 
skies begin, 

Her specialty might be short- 
hand notes, 

But beauty culture gets her 
votes. 



ARLENE HALL 

She doesn't give opinions, 

On that we'll all agree, 

But in automobiles she has 

a choice — 
She prefers a Model T. 



DOROTHY HALL 

Dot's a wee bit bashful, 
It seems so anyway, 
Every time we see her 
She hasn't much to say. 



CHARLES HARLOW 

That Charlie will some day 

succeed 
No one's inclined to doubt, 
If present sign-posts we may 

heed, 
He'll put them all to rout. 



GILBERT HARLOW 

Phyllis, Jeannette, and 

Margv. 
Tid and Lolly, too, 
Would vou kindly tell us, 

"Gilly", 
Which one "bothers" you? 



10 



THE PILGRIM 



MARY HARTY 

Mary has no time to play 
Because in Woolworth's 

every day 
She works the afternoon a- 

way — 
Keeping the evening to be 

gay. 



WILLIAM HEMMERLY 

One day when we read the 
news, 

The headlines will announce, 

How William, hunting kan- 
garoos, 

A great big bear did trounce. 



ARTHUR HUGHES 

"Sunshine's" always in his 

glory 
When the football season's 
i here, 
When you mention pig-skin 

to him, 
Watch him grin from ear to 

ear. 



BERTHA JAMES 

Time flies swiftly 
But what does she care? 
It's one minute of eight 
Before she's in her chair. 



EVELYN JOHNS 

Petite and sweet — that's 

Evelyn, 
We've liked her from the 

start, 
There's no denying, each 

one's trying 
To steal our "Evy's" heart. 



RUBY JOHNSON 

Ruby's quite busy, 
She studies so hard! 
Who gets her spare time? 
The answer is "Card." 



WILLIAM KETCHEN 

When Bill sees "Fran" walk 

down the street, 
Always looking prim and 

neat, 
His heart's been known to 

stop and leap, 
For he thinks that she is very 

sweet. 



ARLENE KNIGHT 

We like you a lot, 
You're happy and gay, 
Any more information 
We'll get from Ray. 



DORA La ROCQUE 

Just wait 'til they play 
"Here comes the Bride," 
For she'll be there 
At Harvey's side. 



MARY LAURENTI 

We hear you like to be alone. 
Say, what is this, a game? 
But alone, or in a big crowd, 
We'd like you just the same. 



PAUL LENZI 

It's been said that Paul is 

bashful, 
Yet as far as we can see, 
He gets into little troubles — 
Ask the teachers, they'll 

agree. 



BARBARA LEWIS 

Barb's a perfect sample 
Of an "All-American Girl," 
She "goes" with fifteen dif- 
ferent boys 
And keeps each one in a 
whirl. 



THE PILGRIM 



11 



RUTH McMAHON 

Ruth went away and left us, 
For New York, she let us 

down, 
But back she came arunning 
To good old Plymouth town. 



JANE MATHESON 

Moderate and friendly, 
Nothing haughty there, 
Jane is very sensible 
And truly fair and square. 



MARY McLEAN 

That she stands high there 
is no doubt, 

A budding suffragette, 

And yet she has her domes- 
tic side — 

That she'll get what she 
wants is our bet. 



THOMAS MITCHELL 

Tommy's out for basketball 
With shoulders big and wide, 
And that head of bushy hair 
He's not inclined to hide. 



ANNA O'BRIEN 

Anna's always on the dot, 
She's there to get your dime, 
And when it comes to sports- 
manship, 
We'll choose her anytime. 



KATHERINE O'CONNELL 

This young lady will surely 

be 
A piano player like Pade- 

rewski, 
We wish her luck — a happy 

career, 
And some day soon of her 

fame we'll hear. 



KENNETH O'CONNELL 

Kenny isn't very big, 
But regardless of his height, 
If you like the saxaphone, 
He'll play it for you right. 



BERNARD PARKER 

His long legs are, it seems to 

me, 
An asset not to be surpassed, 
If you're behind him in the 

sun, 
Watch the yards of shadows 

cast. 



GERDA PETERSON 

This lady's just as pretty 
As pictures she can make, 
We wish her luck along the 

way, 
Whatever path she take. 



HARRIETT PHILLIPS 

"Happy" dances, sings, and 

swims, 
She can play piano, too, 
And now among her passing 

( ? ) whims 
She's finding time for love so 

true. 



FLORENCE PIMENTAL 

"Flossie" is a fine girl 
With a smile for everyone, 
And when she tackles any- 
thing, 
It's sure to be well dene. 



FRANCES PINNEY 



A tall, young blond is 

Frances 
Who lives in Manomet, 
And when it comes to dances, 
"Fran" is there, you bet! 



12 



THE PILGRIM 



JOHN NICKERSON 

His father owns a cranberry 

bog, 
And you will some day see 
"Nicky" and his little dog 
Head of the company. 



CAROLYN PRATT 

At school you're known as 

Carolyn, 
A sociable type of maid, 
But when the summer rushes 

in, 
You become "Priscilla' staid. 



JOHN PRENTICE 

Of these "men of few words" 
We hear every day, 
And our class has in John 
One of these, anyway. 



BARBARA PROFFETTY 

Barbara plays fine basketball, 
As goalie in hockey she 

shines, 
But when the evening 

shadows fall, 
For a certain Tommy she 

pines. 



JENNIE PROVINZANO 

Here's another singer 
We'll not have next year, 
But we hope that in the 

future 
On the air her voice we 11 

hear. 



JOSEPH QUERZE 

Our orchestra leader's going 

strong, 
He's out for something 

"steady," 
But maestro, when you get 

your band, 
Please don't holler, "Ready!" 



ALDEN RAYMOND 

Our Tote used to have a girl 
And vowed to love her long, 
Tho' he lost her — we dis- 
cover 
"Margie's" still his favorite 
song. 



JOHN ROSSETTI 

John's our well-known usher 
In uniform neat and smart, 
We hope the feminine movie 

fans 
Won't try to steal his heart. 



CHARLES ROTH 

We have often wondered 

But never inquired 

Why your tongue does not 

blunder 
Nor your jaws grow tired. 



JEAN RUSHTON 

Why don't you wear a plaid 

dress 
And a kilt for all to watch ? 
For everyone in town, we 

guess, 
Knows you're a wee bit 

Scotch. 



JOHN SANTOS 

Johnny's quite a he-man, 
His voice his joy and de- 
light— 
The reason he uses it often 
Is to see that it's still all 
right. 



ALICE SAVERY 

Some days you're happy, 
Some days you're blue, 
Is Nino the person 
That's troubling you? 



THE PILGRIM 



13 



WADSWORTH SAVERY 

His morning's boring 
His evening's gay, 
A dilettante 
\/ho likes to play. 



IDA SCAGLARINI 

[da co-.Ties from SouLh Street, 
A "tough" place so they say, 
Yet there's nothing tough 

about Ida, 
She wasn't made that way. 



RUSSELL SEARS 

That Russell is a farmer boy 
Is very plain to see, 
In tilling soil he finds much 
joy 

In Chiltonville-by-the-sea. 



JULIET SGARZI 



"Wherefore art thou, Ro- 

rreo?" 
To her brother she will call, 
When dressed to kill, she has 

the will 
To grace the Cordage Hall. 



ROMEO SGARZI 

Does he know his gas and 

oil? 
"Shell's" his middle name, 
But when you see that flivver 

coming, 
He's playing another game. 



JOSEPH SHAW 

We predict that Mr. Shaw 
Really ought to study law, 
We can tell he's very wise, 
Look, and see it in his eyes. 




FRANCES SHEA 

Daring and pert, 
Audaciously gay, 
Happy-go-lucky, 
That's "Fran" Shea. 



HOWARD SHERMAN 

A second Noah Webster 
Is what this lad may be, 
[f you want a definition, 
He'll give it readily. 



MANUEL SILVA 

We seldom see this lad about 

In town or anywhere, 

We wonder what he does with 

all 
The time he has to spare. 



FRANK SIRRICO 

Of course, he comes from 

South Street 
Where nicknames are galore, 
We wonder if you ever heard 
Him called "Hot-dog" before. 



LEROY SMITH 

A dark-haired boy with a 

twinkling eye 
Who's head is in a constant 

whirl, 
Why, ev'ry night he climbs 

on high 
To see a certain Sophomore 

girl! 



LORETTA SMITH 

We'd like to say such fine 

things 
About a girl like you, 
But we'll just wish you the 

best of luck 
In everything you do. 



14 



THE PILGRIM 



ROSIDA SMITH 

She has a very common 

name, 
Not like herself, you see, 
For she's a different type of 

girl — 
A real lady she will be. 



CARLO STROCCHI 

Carlo's quite an artist, 
His fame is bound to mount — 
But we wish we could dis- 
cover 
Just why they call him 
"Count". 



HARRY TAYLOR 

Who is the blonde 
You meet at night? 
And we hear that singing 
Is your delight. 



DOROTHY TESTONI 

Dot's an "ace" in studies, 

In typing too, we know, 

In sports she's just as 

spunky — ■ 
But, Dot, why don't you 

grow? 



KENNETH TINGLEY 

Ken, here's hoping your lungs 

never burst, 
They'll be needed, we fear, in 

some way, 
Perhaps in selling "Class 

Sportsmanship" 
Or blowing your horn some 

day. 



HARVEY TRACY 

As an example of a "one-girl 
man" 

He surely takes the cake, 

We hear of him most fre- 
quently 

Asking Dora for a "break". 



EDWARD TUCKER 

Greta Garbo of Hollywood 
Plays many a leading part, 
But this big blonde of 

P. H. S. 
Is our only American 

"Swede" heart. 



CORA VICKERY 

Cora chums with Dora, 

Is oft mistaken for her twin, 

But what about this boy 

named Stan? 
Her affections he's out to 

win. 



EDITH WALKER 

Of Edith we are envious, 
For her face is very fair, 
Her clothes are simply gor- 
geous 
But her glory's in her hair. 



JUSTIN WALKER 

Judy's won the victory, 
His name's in P. H. history 
With Romano, "Sparky," and 

the rest, 
He really should achieve suc- 
cess. 



EDWARD WARNSMAN 

Surely our Eddie in music 
Will find the same success 
He hopes to find in Kingston 
With the girl who means — 
happiness. 



SARAH WIELD 

She's going to be a secretary. 
Where — we do not know, 
But, because she's always 
merry, 

Success with her will go. 



THE PILGRIM 



15 



MARGARET WHITING 

You've given service to the 
school, 

With fiddle, voice, and art, 

We hope in life you'll play- 
some day 

Another "leading part". 



CHARLOTTE WINKLEY 

Two pretty eyes that look 

very wise 
And make all men rejoice, 
But her spoken word can 

never be heard, 
Though she talks at the top 

of her voice. 



LINO ZANIBONI 

We heard a squeal the other 

day 
As if someone were dying, 
We later found that Lino 
A piece on his "sac" was try- 
ing. 




^ t **S(*l$M8BHmk^ 











-. 




f» 




2V*r 




ELLIS WOOD 

Agnes was his first love, 
But since that time, oh my, 
Now he thinks he's some- 
thing 
When he goes riding by. 



ELLEN YOUNG 

You're rather good in music, 
But you proved your skill in 

art 
When you won a contest 
In which you took a part. 



16 



THE PILGRIM 



THE PRESENT 



LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT 
OF THE CLASS OF 1933 

WfE, the dignified, distinguished, and 
determined class of 1933, having 
full testamentary capacity and being in 
a munificent state of mind, do hereby 
bequeath to our instructors, keepers, and 
others who have borne with us through 
our many trials (and in some cases con- 
victions), such material things and bits 
of advice as we deem necessary to the 
proper operation of the school. Due to 
the market crash in our freshman year 
our bequests are in most cases limited 
to our best regards. 

To Mrs. Raymond : The hope that the 
entering class of seniors will be adept 
in the art of interior decorating. When 
we visit Room Eleven several years 
hence, we shall expect to find Persian 
rugs on the floor, Rembrandts on the 
walls, and the class reclining in easy 
chairs. More power to her "Home 
Beautiful" movement in the school. 

To Miss Brown: A Fisher No-draft 
Ventilation System to be installed in 
Room Ten. We are still trying to dis- 
cover the name of the senior who 
brought a hot water bottle to class on 
one cold morning. 

To Mr. Bagnall : A chromium-plated 
steel helmet to replace that felt fedora 
which suffered untold tortures at the 
hands of unscrupulous members of our 
class. We sincerely hope that the new 
"sky-piece" will not show heel prints. 

To Mr. Shipman: We evacuate his 
domain with the sincere hope that not 
more than half of our class will return 
as P. G.'s. It would be decidedly incon- 
venient to hold classes in the halls and 
coat rooms. 

To Mr. Fash : Two of the best rock- 
ing horses in captivity. We know they 
will be appreciated by the fellows who 
hold down rear seats in next year's 
physics class. 

To Miss Carey : We feel that we may 
now freely admit that the only time we 
really mastered those French nasal 
sounds was when we had a bad cold 
which hovered between bronchitis and 
laryngitis. 

To Miss Wilber: May all Seniors in 
the future absorb enough Latin to be 
able to pronounce their class motto. 
We don't dare hope that they will be 
able to translate it. 

To Miss Johnson: A half dozen of 
Duke Ellington's latest phonograph 



records to break the monotony of those 
droning typewriting records. 

To Miss Judd: A robot which will 
automatically say, "Quiet, girls," or, 
"Are you chewing gum?" 

To Mr. Smiley: A can of "Kitty 
Ration" to feed that anaemic-looking 
cat, preserved in alcohol, which annually 
makes its appearance in "bug" class. 

To Mr. Young: A package of grass 
seed with the suggestion that his class 
in agriculture be delegated to grow a 
little grass in that barren place on the 
school lawn. Maybe we should throw in 
a bottle of hair tonic, — for the lawn, of 
course. 

To Mrs. Buck : In order to insure her 
prima donnas against colds on the even- 
ings of their debuts, we are leaving a 
bottle of "Rem." Take Rem and get rid 
of it. The correct time is twenty seconds 
past eight o'clock. 

To Miss Kelly: A room containing 
desks with pointed tops. We realize 
that they won't be very useful, but at 
least no one can sit on them. 

To Mrs. Swift: A liveried chauffeur 
with a high-powered car. We under- 
stand that her present driver seriously 
considers leaving school at the end of 
this year. 

To Mr. Pioppi: We trust that the 
classes to come may contain another 
Querze who can play fiddle and piano, 
and double in drums and bass. 

To Miss Rafter: A set of mason's 
tools to be used in the construction of 
Parthenon and Acropolis with the pro- 
vision that vinegar and plaster of paris 
shall not be used in the building of same. 

To Miss Locklin : The hope that next 
year's "Are you a Genius?" test will dis- 
close a budding Edison. 

To Mr. Smith : An embroidered sign 
reading "God Bless our Happy Home" 
to be hung in Room 12 to provide a 
"homey" atmosphere for next year's 
Alumni Club. May the Ferioli and 
Strocchi sign painting combination have 
competent successors in the class of 
1934. 

To Miss Lang: A package of double- 
action, superpotent cough drops. 

To Miss Jacques: A large, pleasant, 
room with a southern exposure in the 
much-discussed new high school. We ad- 
mit this gift has no tangible value but 
our heart is right. 

To Miss Hendry :Our appreciation 
for teaching some of the fellows in our 
class to bake biscuits. We consider this* 
one of the greatest steps in self-defense 
which has been taken in years. 



THE PILGRIM 



17 



To Miss Dowling: A safe-deposit 
vault equipped with a burglar alarm in 
which to keep those elusive drawing 
supplies. 

To Mr. Mongan : An assistant to aid 
in the preservation of law and order 
after 12 :45. 

To Miss Humphrey: May her Eng- 
lish classes of the future be as well be- 
haved as ours was. Notice to executor; 
any persons laughing at this point shall 
be cut off without a penny. 

To Miss Coombs: A Western Union 
messenger's uniform to be awarded to 
the person who distributes notices next 
year. (The rumor that we stole this 
article from a clothes line has no foun- 
dation.) 

To The Freshman Faculty: We 
hope that after our graduation it will no 
longer be necessary to use tear gas to 
drive upper classmen from the strong- 
hold of the freshmen. 

To The Class 1934 : May next year's 
senior class maintain that dignified 
senior air which we possess. We sug- 
gest that the tendency for senior boys 
to escort sophomores to basketball 
games and dances is most detrimental 
to the aforementioned air. 

To The Class of 1935 : May they en- 
joy the same high opinion in the minds 
of the senior teachers that the class of 
'34 has had. 

To The Class of 1936 : We hope that 
by the time you are seniors most of our 
class will have graduated. 

All bequests contained herein are re- 
ceivable through the executor, Mr. 
Wolverton J. Wolverton, Second Vice- 
President of the class of 1933. 

Witnessed at the offices of Flywheel, 
Shyster, and Flywheel, this thirtieth day 
of March, 1933. 
Attest : 

Frank N. Stein 
Bullmon Tahna 
Chester Racketeer 
Gilbert Harlow, '33 

(Continued from page 4) 

We have enjoyed four years under the 
able eruidance of Gilbert Harlow, the 
only president ever elected by our class. 

Now Time writes the conclusion to 
this chronicle and to the High School 
career of the Class of Thirty-Three, but, 
judging from the record of their past 
achievements, who shall say that in 
these years which stretch before us, not 
minatorily but rather invitingly, the 
members of this class will not be the 
authors of deeds which some day may 
be loudly and widely acclaimed? 

Jane Matheson '33 



CLASS OF '33 MOVIE REVIEW 

The First Year The Lowly Frosh 

No One Man Barbara Lewis 

The Crowd Roars 

At the Brockton Tournament 
Five Star Final 

"Dirty Dirt" or "This and That" 
Secret Service — 

Reporters for the Above 
After Tomorrow Then What? 

Delicious 

Odors from the Cooking Room 
Girls Together Edythe and Sarah 

The Last Mile May and June 

In Conference Before 8 A. M. 

The Ruling Voice 

The Warden, Mr. Shipman 

Platinum Blonde Bob Bartlett 

Daddy Long Legs Bernard Parker 

Too Busy To Work Mike Cavicchi 

Silence In the Study Hall 

Tabu Class Picnic 

I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang 

Cutting Classes 
Donovan's Kid Flossie 

Animal Kingdom Room 27 

God's Gift to Women Pete Ferioli 

He Learned About Women 

Nando Bussolari 
Prosperity For the Seniors? 

The Crooner Eddie Warnsman 

It Pays to Advertise School Play 

Just Imagine All 90's 

Taxi Wadsworth Savery 

Five and Ten Mary Harty 

All Quiet on the Western Front 

Room 12 
The Yellow Ticket 

For "Pirates of Penzance" 
Under 18 Most of Us 

The Girl Habit Gilly Harlow 

Classmates Never forget them 

First Aid For Pete Gellar 

Maker of Men Coach Bagnell 

This Modern Age Class of '33 

Secrets of a Secretary 

Ask Evelyn Johns 
Alias the Doctor Milton Berg 

The Wet Parade On stormy mornings 
Vanity Fair Girls' Drecsing Room 

The Champ Kenneth Tingley 

The Pay Off Class Dues 

This is the Nignt Commencement 



18 



THE PILGRIM 



THEiiOTANY OF LIFE 



"HE HILL, 



■^>-THE HI S : ^O^t>W^MM ROOMER 
>^\NDlI GAZED^TJnYA DEWTRENCWED t^RDEN QUITE STILt* 
WHERE THfeffL 0WERSL50 VARIED, S&BRILLIANT, AMD GAY 
HADE nLVA5>%JHAT WOULD BE A NKITTING BOUQUEH^ 
TOR ME TO POSSESS JWHEN I SETvOUlYYno PRESS 
HY SUIT FOR THETAVOR CF^E^S\JCC€S6W 
ON TlREH^^VfOF THE BREEZE CANE A SILVER tM$C& 
TIY GHIU5-LET HE AID YOU IM P^KIISGjraUR^CHOl'cE' ' 
AS I EOLLOWED^THE ZEmY^EROnlWHjGriXl 
NY GUIDANCE WOULEK:onE,/HE f3l^E < 50R^l\Y 





'RED CLOVER nEAT^rY^LHD^feTRY/AND MIGHT Ta>%JGG 
'THAT YOU GATHER MOPT>§>L%S^QMS OE TTIIS\p' 
•AMD MERE 15 THE IVY EOR THE FRlETtBSHIP 
'WHICH BRIGHTEN YOUR SORROW AND B 
'BUT PAUSE HOT WHERE THOSE PLANTS DR 
TOR EOLLY 10 FOUND IN THE WILD COLUMBINE 
-WHILE FAITH WHICH WE HAVE IN ALMIGHTY GODO 
TS SUGGESTED TO US BY THE PA05 ION FLOWER; 
'CLOSE BY TUNES THE VINE OF THE DEADLY NIGHTS 
'AND ALL FORMS OE FALSEHOOD ITS BEST TO EVADE . 
?3E WISE IN YOUR CHOICE OE THE DRAB-LOOKING OAK 
'AMD THE I INNOCENT CRO05 OF THE CANDY-TUFT '03 CLO 
"HOSPITALITY LIES IN THE FIRST OF, 
TM THE 5EC0ND, TNDFEERENCE OWGULD 
(BY THIS THE, I N PUR5UIT OF NY 'GUipELTll 
ALMOST ALL OR THAT GARDEN ANDBGTjj 
"THOUGH 'TIS COLORED IN TONES' BOtL _ 
"YET GAYETY LIVES IN THIS LILY OE fW-„- 
"NOW CUT A FEW 6TENS OFF THE GOLDE^RON 
AT THE AGE-OLD ' BE CAUTIOUS ' Tpi/lSfWT " 
"GAZE MOT SO LQNGWDN TTiEST RPIM^ofe.-fc 
TOR INCONSTANCY'S SOMETHING THfTtBSNGS 
"LEGEND TELLS US THAT PANSIESMEW 
"WHICH WAS BROUGHT BY THE ANGELO FROM HEAt 
THE BREEZE PAUSED, ALL WAS STILL, HY LESSON. WJA5 ENDEt 
SO I TURNED NY FACE^TOTHIE PATH! WHIC^KveAei>^/< 
OVER THAT STEEP AND ROCKY HILL; Jfolk^.' 

WITH THE THOUGHT INNIND/l CAN, AND WILL!" 

SO I ORRER TO YOU, GLASS OR THIRTY- THREE, 
THIS SELEGT BOUQUET AS 'TLVA5 GHOSEN TOR N1E. 
WITH IT YOUR WORTHINESS AAAY YOU DISPLAY 
IN THE YEARS WHICH FOLLOW COMMENCEMENT DAY. 






.5 



THE PILGRIM 



19 



THE FUTURE | 



CLASS PROPHECY 

"Hello, you lucky listeners-in of this 
age of television. This is "Silent" 
Kenneth Tingley, the mouthpiece of the 
nation, speaking. 

Allow me to acquaint you with the 
many celebrities attending the Inaug- 
ural Ball of President Peter Gellar, in 
the year of our Lord, 1965 — Amen. 

The stout gentleman who just entered 
is none other than Ferdinando Massam- 
iliano Guisseppe Fiocchi, the ex-Czar of 
Golfdom. Times are so bad he now 
carries clubs for three of his former ad- 
mirers, Adele Cohan, Norma Govoni, 
and Arlene Hall. Accompanying him is 
that eminent veterinary, Professor 
Berg, Charles Harlow, the new senator 
from Manomet Heights, Ellen Young, 
the famous evangelist, and her three 
most famous disciples, Dorothy Hall, 
Iolanda Govoni, and Mary Laurenti. 

Peter Ferioli, the chainstore magnate, 
(you've all heard of his Murray Street 
Emporium) enters with his old cronies, 
the Reverend Nick Fortini, and the 
scion of the Mill Village Reform Colony, 
"Count" Strocchi. 

Hold it — the old maestro, Joe Querze 
(he's made quite a name for himself as 
a handorgan player) wishes to make a 
few announcements : 

"Gentlemen and ladies, allow me to 
present the new members of my Royal 
Garlic Templars — Geno Michelwccio 
Ferri, the gold-voiced bass; Leno Zani- 
boni, our new fiddler (he always was 
quite a boy at fiddlin' around) and that 
talented little trombone player, Harriet 
Phillips. 

"Oke, Silent — on with the dance !" 

"The first couples to take the floor are 
"Codger" Davis, the "hosiery" king, and 
his sixteen-year-old fiancee; the Right 
Honourable Nando Bussolari, President 
of the Slash'm and Gash'm Barbers' 
Association, accompanied by Rosa Des 
Lauriers. (How did he ever break loose 
from the "Boss"?) 

The floor is covered with swaying, 
stumbling couples. There goes Charlie 
Govoni, late canine apprehender (dog- 
catcher to you) of Darby Landing, with 
Bruna Gambini and Bud Beauregard, 
guardian angel of the "Little House", 
with Irene Balboni. I am told that Irene 
has lost ninety-three pounds and that 
she now tips the scales at only two 
ninety-nine. Good work, Irene! 

The first dance is over and we are 



about to be entertained by Ida Scagli- 
arini, "Sheba" Pimental, and Gerda 
Peterson. They represent the cream of 
Professor John Govoni's "Harlemites." 

Do you follow me down the lobby? 
From left to right, Charles Elmiron 
Roth, keeper of the New Chiltonville 
Zoo; his superintendent, Fred Gerety; 
Evelyn Johns (she's still waiting for 
that gold-digger, I beg your pardon, 
clam-digger, Guy Brigida, to propose) ; 
Gilbert Besse, famous for his vanities, 
and a group of his charming girls, 
Rosida Smith, Juliet Sgarzi, Alice Sav- 
ery, Carolyn Pratt, and Arlene Knight. 
John Prentice, of East Carver's Detec- 
tive Department, is buying popcorn for 
Edith Halberg, Ruth Haley, and Char- 
lotte Eddy. 

The President hasn't come yet be- 
cause he's in the nursery cutting out 
paper dolls, but the Cabinet is here in all 
its glory. You'll recognize all of them; 
Manuel Silva, Secretary of State; John 
Nickerson, Secretary of Labor; Frank 
Cappella, Secretary of Agriculture; 
"Mickey" O'Connell, Post-Master Gen- 
eral ; Arthur X. Hughes, Attorney Gen- 
eral; (he attained the position because 
he took a course in Dorothy Testoni's 
Correspondence School) ; Francis Pin- 
ney, Secretary of Treasury; and Ber- 
nard Parker, Secretary of War. The 
other members of the Cabinet were dis- 
missed because they wished to be so ab- 
surd as to work for their money. 

Ah, (so this is Africa!) — look up if 
you want a tropical picture. That man 
hanging from the chandelier, and dis- 
playing his eighteen-inch biceps, is none 
other Justin "Atlas" Walker, one-time 
water boy of P. H. S. His wife, the 
former Leah Alberghini, is nearly four 
feet tall now. (She grows better in the 
spring.) 

Seated at the farthest end of the lobby 
are "Baby" Guidetti, Elio Barufaldi, 
and Paul Lenzi, owners of the largest 
chain of pool rooms in the country. 

"Tote" Raymond, tiddley-wink champ, 
is enjoying himself with Misses Sarah 
Weild, Barbara Proffetty, Charlotte 
Winkley, and Frances Burgess. "Tote" 
is always doing something like that! 
Last week he invited Ella Bernagozzi, 
Rose Aldrovandi, Florence Donovan, 
and Barbara Lewis, inmates of an old 
maids' home, to go to a burlesque show. 

Here comes Milo Cavicchi with his 
pushcart. I buy his bananas every time 
he has a fire sale, but they're so bad 
that even the monkeys won't eat them. 

The platinum blonde who is trying to 
vamp Alonzo Canning is Edith "Wall- 



20 



THE PILGRIM 



flower" Walker. You'd think that she 
would get over that at her age ! 

Cora Vickery, who plays opposite 
Mickey Mouse, is here to-night with 
Howard Sherman, inventor of the word- 
less dictionary. 

This is some affair. Bud Hemmerly, 
doorman of the White House, is swap- 
ping jokes with "Mike" Mitchell. You 
know, of Mitchell-O'Connell, Siamese 
twins. 

The celebrated orator, Romeo Sgarzi, 
isn't here to-night. He's delivering a 
speech to the pygmies of South Africa 
on the Gold Standard. 

Here comes Bill Ketchen, master of 
ceremonies. 

Hello, Bill, won't you say something 
for us? 

"Yowzah, Yowzah, Silent. H'lo, every- 
body who isn't here, 'How me to give you 
the lineup for the show. The first 
number will feature Frances Shea's 
"Hot Cha Girls" in "The Dance of the 
Ten Lamp-posts." In her chorus will be 
Katherine O'Connell, Charlotte Burgess, 
Bertha James, Victoria Brewer, Ruth 
McMahon, Mary McLean, Jean Rushton, 
Pauline Callahan, Aura Fortini, and 
Norma Caswell. 

"While we're waiting for that to pass 
off, we may as well listen to the Moaning 
Quartet, featuring Eddie Warnsman, 
Tohn Santos, Peggy Whiting, and Jennie 
Provinzano in their sensational number, 
'Moanin' Low.' (The lower the better.) 

"The second act comes directly to you 
from John Rossetti's circuit. Sahib Yoo 
Hoo Crowell, the magician, has just re- 
turned from Schleswig-Holstein where 
he learned the art of producing a human 
being from nowhere, somewhere, any- 
where, everywhere. (He'll let you have 
your choice.) Yoo Hoo is sending two 
members of the new Da Da political 
party, John Bradford and Bud Savery, 
to inspect two empty trunks on the 
stage. "Da Da et Da Da" ascertain that 
they are empty. 

"Lo and behold ! as the two leave the 
platform, a pair of feet appear over the 
top of the trunk. What a pair of feet ! 
One look and everybody knows that they 
belong to Eddie Tucker! (Poor Eddie, 
handicapped like that.) 

"Yoo Hoo steps to the remaining 
trunk and what does he produce? None 
other than Majorie Cassidy and her 
trained cow, Effenbee ! 

"I'm sorry I have to cut this act short, 
but Silent wants to commence. This is 
Bill Ketchen saying, Cherry-ho." 

"The President's personal secretary, 



Miriam Gifford, is entering. She is go- 
ing to read his Inaugural Address to- 
night. President Pete wants to have 
one more game of checkers with Bob 
Bartlett, but he will never beat Bob. 
(Bob is so crooked that he moves in 
jerks.) 

Loretta Smith, Iris Albertini, and 
Jane Matheson wrote the inaugural ad- 
dress for Eddie Cantor sixteen years 
ago. Cantor refused to accept it, but 
Pete the President didn't. He traded his 
old chauffeurs, Ellis Wood and Joe 
Shaw, a football, and his English 
teacher, Ruby Johnson, for the address. 

Somebody is paging me but I'm not 
tall enough to see over the crowd. I wish 
there were something to stand on — ah, 
that's better. I'm standing on Harry 
Taylor! (Nice fella, that Harry.) 

That was Frank Sirrico looking for 
me. He wants to talk on the Sirrico 
Theory but I'll let him speak to his 
parents instead. Come on, Hot-dog." 

"H'lo, poppa! H'lo, moma! Are youse 
seeing me? Goomby. — Tank you, Silent." 

"The ball is almost over and the only 
couples on the floor are Stanford 
Bowers, our imported Italian Chef, with 
Hazel Clark. Adova Bergamini and 
Leonora Ceccarelli are doing an Irish 
Jig (maybe I'm wrong) with Harvey 
Tracey and Dora LaRocque. 

The muscular woman beside the palm 
tree is Anna O'Brien. She does the 
laundry for the occupants of the White 
House and Congress just for her board 
and spending money. 

Helen Beever is acting as check girl 
to-night. She's only fifty years old but 
doesn't look a day older than seventy- 
three. 

Look who's here ! Henry Gilbert Har- 
low, head jeer leader of the "Big 
House." How you been doin', Henry?" 

"Hear ye, hear ye ! Woe is me ! Num- 
bers 123456, 654321, and I, Number 
123654, you probably know them as 
Sears and Bell, got mixed up in politics. 
(Says Harlow.) I was but putty in the 
hands of Sears and Bell. I was unable 
to follow the straight and narrow road. 
(It was being paved, anyway.) We en- 
gaged in one of Sears' cinch enterprises 
and wound up with an T. Y. I. L. 
(Twenty years in Leavenworth) Woe is 
me, woe is me — " 

"Oh, well! Life's like that! So sorry 
for you, Henry. I must be signing off." 
(Silent alivays was such an understand- 
ing chap.) 

This is "Silent" Kenneth Tingley, the 
mouth-piece of the nation, bidding you 



THE PILGRIM 



21 



all plsasant dreams." (The prevarica- 
tor! Why doesn't he say what he'd like 
to?) 
Bong! 

Two Bitts 
Drarig Innavoignob 
Warren Girard, '33. 
Enzo Bongiovanni, '33. 



OUR SONG ALBUM 

Me — You — Diploma 

Mrs. Winchell's Boy Enzo Bongiovanni 
Thou Shalt Not Talk in the Study Hall 
Smile For Me 

Photographer for "Pilgrim" pictures 
Brother, Can You Spare a Dime? 

lOc-a-week Plan 
If I Ever Get a Job Again 

Post-Graduates 
Walking My Baby Back Home 

Jane and Pete 
Waltzing in a Dream Class Night 

Willow, Weep for Me I flunked 

I'll Have to Change My Plans 

If I don't graduate 
How Deep is the Ocean ? 

Ask the Math Classes 
I'm Playing With Fire 

Writing this column 
Three on a Match 

Leno, Bruna, and Buzzy 
Drifting and Dreaming 'Retta Smith 
I'm Sure of Everything But You 

Class Day 
Two Loves Have I Gilly Harlow 

Going, Going, Gone 

Class Night Tickets 
Play, Fiddle, Play Joe Querze 

I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues 

Fiocchi of the Hole-in-One Club 
Prisoner's Song Cliff Cobb 

Oh — That Kiss In the Operetta 

Music in My Fingers Harriett Phillips 
Let's Call it a Day 

Girard, Fiocchi, Bongiovanni, Ferri 
I'll Never Have to Dream Again 

If I Graduate 
Underneath the Arches Reception 

Listen to the German Band 

Querze's Little Symphony 
A Boy and a Girl Were Dancing 

Eddie W. and Dot. T. 
Kitten on the Keys "Butter" James 

I'll Miss You in the Evening 

Homework 
You!ve got me in the Palm of your Hand 

Nando Bussolari 



Tired Sixth Period 

After Twelve o'clock 

Davis doing homework 

We'll See It Through 

Volta's Orchestra for Class Night 
Don't Tell a Soul— 

And the whole school will soon know it 
The Song I Wrote For You 

Class Poems 

One Little Word Led to Another 

Class Meetings 

Everything Must Have an Ending 

Even School Days 

Please Don't Talk About Us When 

We've Gone The Class of '33 

Just an Echo in the Valley 

Freshman Days 

Wasn't It Beautiful While It Lasted 

High School Days 
Just a Little Street Where Old Friends 
Meet Lincoln Street 

Some Day We'll Meet Again 

Class Reunions 



FAVORITE SAYINGS OF 
OUR TEACHERS 

Miss Brown: "As student of political 

theory would say — " 
Mrs. Raymond : "From a psychological 

standpoint — " 
Mr. (Chief) Bagnall : "Take a rest!" 

or "Just one minute !" 
Miss Judd: "Are you chewing gum?" 
Miss Rafter: "Phyllis, will you ever 

learn to keep still?" 
Miss H. C. Johnson: "Quiet, girls!" 
Miss Kelly : "Eyes on your books — not 

on the keyboard!" 
Miss Locklin: "Berg and Besse, will 

you keep still?" 
Miss Lang: "I don't talk just to hear 

my own voice!" 
Mrs. Swift : "The United States is just 

where the Roman Empire was before 

it fell!" 
Mr. Smiley : "Therefore—" 
Mr. Fash : "It's a mere technicality." 
Miss Carey: "Enzo, mangez-vous le 

'chewing gum'?" 
Miss Jacques: "Where are you sup- 
posed to be this period?" 
Miss Humphrey: "The verb 'to be' 

never takes an object." 
Miss Wilber: "Will you ever get past 

that stage?" 
Miss Hendry: "Stir that — don't let it 

burn !" 
The Faculty as a Whole: "This is the 

worst class I've ever had !" 



22 



THE PILGRIM 




WANTED — AN EXPLANATION 

TTHE mysterious is always fascinating. 
Men always take extreme delight in 
speculating, theorizing, and wondering 
about subjects which are little known or 
difficult to explain. The fields of general 
science and natural history offer more 
in the way of unanswered questions than 
the "theory of relativity" which Mr. 
Einstein has so kindly advanced and 
"simplified" for the benefit and advance- 
ment of the more ignorant "common 
herd" (composed of the average human 
beings) which is, foolishly enough, 
merely concerned with terrestrial, not 
celestial, activities, and extremely negli- 
gent in the impractical theorizing on 
the why, how, when, and wherefore of 
the almost supernatural mysteries of 
the universe. 

Such a puzzle as bird migration in- 
terested the ancients thoroughly, and 
is not completely understood. Al- 
though we have advanced beyond the 
limit of supposing that birds disappear 
beneath the waves of the ocean during 
the winter and return in the spring, we 
do not yet know where our most abun- 
dant species winter. What governs the 
mysterious journeys of the eels? Why do 
some go from the West Indies to Europe 
while others from the same location 
cling to the American coastline? How 
do little eels know where to diverge amid 
the trackless waters, each keeping to 
its elders' range? What guides newly- 
hatched sea-turtles invariably toward 
the ocean? What makes — but these are 
only passing examples of the mysteries 
of Nature, all of them having to do with 
living things. 

What becomes of animals that meet 
death in the field or woods? It is 
among "the beasts that perish" that 
mystery and mystification rear their 
heads and fire the imagination with 
questions which receive no answer. 
When one considers the "law of nature," 
the preying of the strong upon the weak, 
the survival of the fittest, one must 
realize that enormous numbers of the 
lower animals perish and the number of 
dead are many times the number living, 
yet the tiny proportion of their remains 



which later come to light is extraordin- 
ary. Eagles have been known to pass 
the "century mark," but how many 
people have found an eagle's skeleton? 

It is reasonably correct to suppose 
that some of the big grizzly bears die a 
natural death, but if any have been 
found, few persons know about it. 
(authority: Alexander Sprunt, Jr.) 
Likewise, the finding of a deer's skeleton 
in territory where these animals are 
abundant is unusual, yet some wounded 
ones must escape the hunter and die 
iater. What becomes of the antlers that 
deer, moose, and elk alike shed annually ? 
So rare is the finding of these antlers 
that the theory of the animals burying 
their own antlers as they drop has been 
offered and accepted by many. 

The durability of skeletons in resist- 
ing the elements may be proved by the 
great number of prehistoric skeletons 
that are found, but even if vegetation, 
mold, and decay destroyed in the torrid 
and temperate zones all the remains of 
even the larger animals, what becomes 
of inanimate life in the frigid zones? 
The skeleton of a huge mastodon was 
found in Siberia, if we remember 
correctly, with the flesh of this animal 
that existed over a million years ago 
still in an excellent state of preserva- 
tion. If the remains of this animal of 
another age were preserved by the cold, 
what becomes of the skeletons of polar 
bears, walrus, and other forms of Arctic 
life? (The Eskimos could not possibly 
make all of them into needles, spears, 
and hatchets.) 

Many may doubt and ridicule the 
statements as to the scarcity of the 
skeletons of eagles, elk, deer, walrus, 
"bars", and polar "bars", but who will 
doubt the rarity of finding a dead 
elephant? Perhaps "relatively speak- 
ing" (with sincere apologies to Ein- 
stein) they crawl under a leaf in the 
jungle, or, just as logically, are rein- 
carnated into the now popular "pink 
elephants" that are usually found on 
walls and ceilings by those brave souls 
who invade the "sacred confines" of the 
modern speakeasy. 

This ridicule is, perhaps, unnecessary, 
but seriously, in spite of the fact that 



THE PILGRIM 



23 



much of this article is interrogative, 
the perhaps poorly formulated idea is 
to awaken an interest in the mysteries 
of our own world, and to show the folly 
of the world's most intelligent men 
seemingly wasting their time and en- 
ergy in the building up and the tearing 
down of impractical theories concern- 
ing the universe. The average man 
shows little interest in this field. Is it 
not better that the magnificent brains 
that these men possess should be put to 
a more practical use such as delving 
into terrestrial mysteries, instead of 
worrying about the expanding and con- 
tracting of the universe or the method 
of advancing "technocracy"? 

Robert Martin '34 



ON JIG-SAW PUZZLES 

"Crossword puzzles! nay, nay! 
But jig-saiv puzzles,, hey hey!" 

CINCE the beginning of Time, people 
have sat up nights trying to think of 
ways to waste it. But with the sudden 
popularity of jig-saw puzzles, their 
troubles are solved. "Rome wasn't built 
in a day — runs the old adage, but with 
the time wasted in doing these puzzles 
in the U. ,S. in one week, Rome, Chicago, 
and points west could bave been erected, 
and by hand. 

Insane asylums provide their inmates 
with these puzzles to keep them busy, so 
the mentally deficients' brain will run in 
circles, squares, angles, and curlicues, 
instead of in a single track. The jig- 
saw puzzle's popularity is due to de- 
pression. Instead of worrrying where 
the next loaf of bread is coming from, 
the head of the house ponders as to how 
he can place a "portable" chimney, on a 
"possible" cottage. 

Not only is jig-saw puzzling a waste 
of time, but long seances with a mass of 
jumbled edges is harmful to the op- 
tics. People used to see spots before 
their eyes, but now it is corners which 
dance before them. Many a highly 
nervous person has been reduced from 
a normal being to a shrieking maniac 
who raves and swears he'll heave the 
blankety thing out the window. 

Why not apply the principle of jig- 
saw puzzling in a beneficial way? For 
instance: at breakfast time hide 
hubby's toast in one corner and half 
an egg in the kitchen oven, and let him 
look for them. Not only will the exer- 
cise do him good, but it will train his 
senses to be on the alert. Another 
method of procedure would be to have 



the office secretary tear up all import- 
ant letters and let the boss put them to- 
gether again. When his job was com- 
pleted, at least he would be rewarded 
with more than a picture he'd seen 
hundreds of times before. 

Miriam Gifford '33 



AT THE ELEVENTH HOUR 

W/TIEN my sister begged me to take 
her to the basketball game and 
dance, instead of going to the theatre to 
see Marie Dressier, I naturally thought 
of the comedy that I should miss. How- 
ever, I was compensated by witnessing 
a short drama more humorous than 
some comedies where the actions of the 
actors are forced in an effort to pro- 
duce a laugh, and no humor is present 
except in the eyes of youngsters. 

In the large hall, we sat in the third 
ssction of the first balcony. A few rows 
in front of us sat an interesting little 
girl, — little, I say, but only in size and 
in her eleven years; for in dress and 
actions she had the air of a prepossess- 
ing grown-up miss who was conscious 
of good looks. She was dressed in a 
short, red shirt, closefitting, red sweater, 
and a red tarn, perched on her comely- 
shaped head revealed, at the nape of her 
neck, a mass of short, brown hair which 
had apparently been curled, judging by 
the way in which a small hand was lifted 
every now and then to see if each curl 
were still in its place. The small hand 
was lifted in a manner which bespoke 
of the endeavors of Miss Somebody to 
impress casual glancers with a graceful 
gesture. 

During the game, Miss Gwendolyn 
le Moyne sat behind several boys whom 
she endeavored to engage in conversa- 
tion. She succeeded only in drawing the 
partial attention of the biggest boy and 
a few words from the others in reply to 
her remarks, in spite of the pert little 
nose, well-shaped chin, and sparkling 
brown eyes. She did not realize that at 
a basketball game, although a girl of 
her age and type may primarily be in- 
terested in boys, boys her age would be 
more interested in the game than in a 
pretty girl. However, it might not hold 
girl. However, it might not hold true in 
true in the case of older boys. The cool 
responses of the boys had no effect on 
her good opinion of herself and she kept 
on making remarks and chewing her 
gum as persistently as ever. Surely some 
of the boys would dance with her when 
the time came. 



24 



THE PILGRIM 



The gams was over. Dancing had be- 
gun. Meanwhile, several big boys had 
summoned a little fellow from the front 
row, to whom Miss Somebody had tried 
to talk, and were now shamefully brib- 
ing the little boy to dance with Gwen- 
dolyn. After many refusals, the boy ap- 
proached Gwendolyn, and she, unaware 
of the cause of his appearance, raised 
her head with a victorious air and left 
her seat. Down the steps which led to 
the dance floor she proudly walked with 
her partner. Could they dance? I was 
never to know. 

On the last step, terror suddenly 
seized the boy, judging by the expres- 
sion on his face. He looked at the 
dancers towering above him, at the 
smooth floor, hesitated a brief second, 
and then — . Up the stairs which he had 
slowly descended, he ran, deserting 
Gwendolyn. And she, a wave of morti- 
fication crossing her face, fled, disap- 
pearing through an exit conveniently 
nearby. 

Iris Albertini, '33 



WORK OF THE STORM 

O'er the castle, black and gloomy, 
Thunder rolled in fearful crash ; 
Lightning sprang, like some white steed 
Maddened by the battle's gore, 
Down to earth, with crash triumphant, 
Seizing, gripping those black walls, 
Tearing asunder gloomy dungeons, 
Laying bare the farthest chambers, 
Crashing through the winding stair- 
ways, 
Sending madness mid its splendor. 
Thrice it flashed, and thrice succeeded, 
Struck its prey and, loose once more, 
Soared to heaven. Thunder rumbled, 
Rolled, muttering in dying anger — 
Storm had left its prey to darkness. 
Far below the sky the ruins, 
Black and charred, with vast halls 
crumbled, 

Lay in majesty — the remnant 
Of the fire from heaven triumphant. 
Of the knights and of the ladies, 
Of the gorging banquet feasters, 
Of the yelping curs and beggars, 
Of the serfs and peasants lowly, 
None remained ; but in the darkness, 
In the charred and broken ruins 
Lay one thing untouched by fire, 
One thing left by storm unravaged — 
Symbol of a brave knight's courage — 
Sword! Unbroken, gleaming brightly, 
Yet you lie among the ruins, 
Remnant of forgotten splendour ! 

Marion E. McGinnis, '35 



DISHES 

pOR twenty-five years, she, Maggie 
McLeod, had placed those dishes on 
the table and then taken them off. 
Twenty-five years, three hundred and 
sixty-five days a year, three times a 
day — it exhausted her to think of it. 
And now she would never have to do it 
again ! oh ! During those first few years, 
how she had loved it; planning for meals 
just what her William would like, and 
then afterwards carefully washing and 
wiping the shiny, new, pink and white 
plates! Sometimes William had helped 
her, but not often, because he was so 
liable to break her precious dishes. 

— Then during the first years of 
little Johnnie's life, she had enjoyed 
cooking for her hungry husband and her 
growing babe. How the baby used to 
gurgle as she fed him from the little 
mug with the kittens on it that his Aunt 
Ruth had sent him ! Poor little Johnnie 
— they had striven so hard in the old 
days to give him everything. She had 
been happy to make sacrifices for the 
baby. And then the night that William 
was killed — 

Her vision blurred and she stopped 
her dreaming to wipe her spectacles. 
Time had dulled but not killed the pain 
which seized her heart when she re- 
called that horrible night — the strangely 
ill-at-ease man who had tried to explain 
to her that the train had jumped the 
tracks and William was dead. At first 
her numbed brain had refused to be- 
lieve it, but finally — 

Well, no use to bring back those mem- 
ories now. She hadn't minded getting 
the meals and washing dishes for 
Johnnie, but all too soon he had grown 
up and left her — to make his own way 
in the world, he had said. After that 
only force of habit made her prepare 
the three light meals a day for herself 
alone. Gradually the once-loved task 
had become hateful. 

But now she was to be alone no 
longer. Johnnie was coming home — 
coming home to take her away to meet 
his wife and to live with them. Johnnie 
was rich now, he said in his letters, and 
she would never again have to wash 
dishes. 

Humming to herself, she prepared 
her meal and ate it. A boiled egg, a cup 
of tea — that was all she required now. 
Her mind formed a little song — John- 
nie's coming home, Johnnie's coming 
home — she would never be alone again. 
How had she endured it all these years? 

The doorbell rang. Could it be 



THE PILGRIM 



25 



Johnnie so soon? She patted her dress, 
her hair, and ran to the door. But it 
was only a messenger boy. She took the 
telegram and went back to her meal. 
The song was still in her mind — 
Johnnie's coming home, Johnnie's 
coming home — 

She had finished her meal before she 
remembered the message. Then, with 
the hesitancy most people have about 
opening telegrams, she opened it and 
read : 

"Madam : 

We are very sorry to inform you 
your son died this morning from acute 
alcoholism in the Westchester County 
Hospital. Please communicate with 
J. P. O'Brien, 

Chief of Police 
Westchester, N. J." 

For a long time she sat still, too dazed 
to move. Over and over she read the aw- 
ful missive. How could that little slip 
of yellow paper have such an effect on 
her life? For hours she sat there, un- 
moving. 

Then she rose and started to clear the 
dishes from the table — 

Florence Armstrong, '34 



WILLETT RAINER SNOW 
RECONNOITERS 

TWLLLETT was born when it was hail- 
ing. They blamed that for his ap- 
parent lunacy although the hail was 
really not to blame. It was his brain. 
Many people said he had none. That 
would appear to be impossible, but even 
now there is a question. He almost 
died. The specialist said pneumonia. 
Mavbe it was brain-fever. Who knows? 
Nobody but the doctors — and even they 
may not. He's alive now, though. He 
wouldn't have been missed if he had 
died. That is, nobody but himself would 
have known it. Perhaps he wouldn't 
have. The only way he could have found 
out was to have tried. He didn't try. 
Probably didn't know enough to if he 
had wanted. He fell downstairs once. 
That's what made him cross-eyed. He 
is, you know. The doctors couldn't 
straighten them. He didn't care — 
-couldn't look any worse anyhow. Red- 
headed — his aunt was. She wasn't dumb, 
though. At least not so bad as he was. 
Black-eyed — space — the unknown quan- 
tity. No, it couldn't have been the hail ! 
Willett Rainer Snow, graduate of 
Detective Correspondence School Incor- 
porated, peered around the corner of the 
house. Nothing there — he wasn't sur- 



prised. He ran quickly to a tree, climbed 
up — resembled an ape in the branches. 
Jumped down — ran up the steps. Sat 
in a chair just as his red-headed aunt 
came around the corner — appeared not 
to notice her. She had seen his actions 
from a window. Two men entered. 
Willett and the men left to buy an ice- 
cream at the nearest soda fountain. Left 
in large covered truck, passed soda foun- 
tain, and continued. Ended in padded 
cell. Taunton! 

Joseph Shaw, '33 



TREASURES 



The greedy, grasping miser 

clutches his gold, and 
Presses it to his bosom 

with a covetous cackle. 
The actress, thirsty for fame, 

gloats over the 
Clamorous applause of her 

admirers. 
The teacher smiles with satisfaction 

at the close of a long life 
Of continued service — guiding and aid- 
ing 

youth to learning. 
The scientist receives his long- 
desired reward — 
Recognition. 
The aviator realizes his dream — 

accomplishes the unprecedented 
feat — 
Spans the Atlantic. 
I sit before the 

open fire 
Recalling happy memories, 
And thank God 

for friends — 
My treasures ! 

Shirley M. Dutton, '34 



THE OLD MAID TURNS 
Happy birthday, dear friends say, 
Looking younger every day ! 
Tell me Fortune smiles on me, 
'Cause I'm forty, yet I'm free. 

Then their glances slyly stray, 
Note, "Her hair is turning gray." 
'Ads' that I have read declare 
Gentlemen prefer them fair. 

Should I, could I dye my hair? 
Well, I wonder, do I dare? 
Yes, I'll buy some Golden Glint, 
Greying hair shall give no hint — I'm 
forty ! 

Please some man shall find me fair, 
Gazing on my golden hair, 
Though it's wrong to change myself, 
Gosh, it's lonesome on the shelf. 

A. Cohan, '33 



26 



THE PILGRIM 



AND WE SCOFFED 



WITH awe and reverence intermingled, 
I stood gazing up at the queenly, ivy- 
covered buildings that were to harbor 
me for four years. College, at last. All 
my hopes, my fears, my very future lay 
there. Some strangely sweet, foreign 
feeling crept into my heart, a salty tear 
slid from my eye. 

"Act your age," I sternly admonished 
myself. 

"Can't," sobbed a voice 'way down in- 
side me. 

Striving vainly for a nonchalant air, 
I drew in my quivering breath and 
strode into — my Future. 

I passed through the various stages 
of humble freshman, hopeful sopho- 
more, and lofty junior. I soon learned to 
adjust myself to college life and its 
highly modernized ideas. From my 
classmates I learned that honesty is 
practiced only by those who would never 
get anywhere, that it is doubtful if there 
is any God, that I should take all life 
and people offered and give nothing in 
return. 

At first I was horrified when I heard 
the deformed, twisted ideas of scoffing, 
incredulous youths, and I burst out with 
rage to defend all the ideals which were 
sacred to me. Many students exchanged 
pitying glances and their mocking 
titters cut into my heart. It was the 
fear of being labeled "queer", of being 
avoided by my classmates, that finally 
drove me to accept their conceptions. 
Gradually I became foremost in the 
ranks of those condemning idealism. 
That we might be wrong never occurred 
to our blinded reason. Like beings grop- 
ing in the dark, we refused to open our 
eyes to sane, practical logic. Only one 
of our great numbers remained un- 
changed. 

Tom Smidt was by no means a shin- 
ing student. Rather he belonged to the 
plodding legion that trudges cheerfully 
on its way, day by day, year in and year 
out, never quite reaching the goal. Tom 
was an idealist from the bottom of his 
huge feet to the tip of the fair hair 
waving defiantly from the top of his 
head. He listened respectfully to our ar- 
guments but accept our conceptions he 
would not. Perhaps it was because he 
was so impassive to our onslaughts, per- 
haps a thousand things, anyway Tommy 
was popular among us boys despite his 
strange standards. How Fate was to 
twist our lives and his was unforseen. 
If we could have but known ! 

It was the custom at our college for 
each boy to attend a military camp for 



six weeks training during the summer. 
We c.ll felt the thrill that comes with the 
handling of instruments of destruction. 
How proudly we bore ourselves in our 
uniforms of olive drab ! Indeed at times 
we wished some one would start a small 
war that we might display to our admir- 
ing countrymen our knowledge of death- 
spitting cannons, destructive bombs, 
suffocating gases that turned a man's 
face green and blinded as they killed. No 
one obliged us with a war and so fortu- 
nately or unfortunately our lives were 
saved. 

Our classroom was a great pit in the 
ground with a slanting sheetiron roof 
and strong concrete walls. There was 
but one entrance which was worked by 
a combination lock that only the in- 
structor knew how to open. During 
class this door was locked. These pre- 
cautions were necessary, for the pit was 
a veritable arsenal where army muni- 
tions were stored. 

One morning we began the absorbing 
study of learning to throw a hand 
grenade. The instructor demonstrated 
how to pull the plug and estimate the 
time in which it explodes. We clus- 
tered eagerly about him to see the work- 
ing of this wonderful implement. Tom 
alone stood back, horror and revulsion 
stamped on his heavy features. These 
days were torture for him. He hated 
war with an intensity that frightened 
me. At night I heard his whispered 
pleas, saw the tears which wet his face, 
saw the bruised soul shining through 
his eyes. 

The instructor went on in a calm voice 
trying not to see the awful look on 
Tom's face. 

Across the room some careless student 
dropped a gun with a loud clatter and 
the instructor hurried to see what 
damage had been done, leaving the gre- 
nade in a student's hand. I can't recall 
exactly what happened then. In some 
way the plug had been accidently pulled ! 

"Mr. Daley!" shrieked the panic- 
stricken student. Stark terror gripped 
him. He threw the bomb from him. As 
in some horrible dream we heard it 
clatter on the floor. 

One man only could open the door to 
safety. Even he could not do it in the 
few seconds of life that were left. Eyes 
dilated, shivering we waited. Somehow 
I found myself praying, pleading with 
the One I had forsaken. Nearer and 
nearer came Death. Hysterical cries and 
sobs rent the air. Death was nearly up- 
on us. 

Suddenly a body hurtled by me. Tom ! 



THE PILGRIM 



27 



With a sickening pain I knew what he 
was doing. Straight upon the grenade 
he threw himself. 

"Tommie, don't do it, don't do it, 
don't — ." A deafening explosion, then 
darkness closed about me. 

When I awoke I was in the hospital, 
my head bandaged. Tom was dead. Of 
all the men in the classroom only he had 
deserved to live. Why, why was he the 
one to die ? Was it because only he was 
fit to enter the Kingdom of Heaven ? No, 
I cried, it can't be, there is no heaven! 
And as I spoke those words, I knew I 
was lying, knew that for three years I 
had been deceiving myself. 

We started living anew, trying to be 
a bit like Tommy. 

People think I'm insane when I say I 
hear his voice. But I do. I hear it in the 
sobbing tones of the organ, when the 
song of the birds fills the air, when the 
silent snow falls lightly, when I kneel at 
the altar. Yes, Tommy and I have be- 
come intimate friends. 

Alba Martinelli, '36 



A MESSAGE TO TELL 

There are millions in far lands who 
ne'er have been told 
That Jesus, His life hath laid down ; 
Which was precious, more precious than 
rubies or gold 
And to us will He give a crown 
If we only believe on His Name, in His 
Word — 
How we're saved from sin by His 
Grace, 
And some day in His Kingdom we'll be 
with our Lord ; 
We'll gaze on His heavenly Face. 
We will serve, work and play, we will 
laugh, praise and sing. 
Oh, happy, how happy we'll be ! 
May the millions be told, may they not 
miss a thing. 
Lord, if Thy will, please send me! 

Ellen Young, '33 



THE BLESSED TOILER 

God gave me all — 

Days of ceaseless labor 

Drudgery — breaking my bones. 

Sweat and grime 

Upon my brow, 

Drilling tirelessly 

In the black, damp mines. 

Yet— 

God gave me all. 

Nights of peaceful rest 
.Contented — in my solitude. 
Love and laughter 



In my heart, 

A prayer to Him 

Who blessed me with Faith. 
In Him I trust. 

Bruna Gambini, '33 
SANS CENTS 
Why are you sad, strange little boy? 
Is it because someone has broken your 

toy? 
In your gay, knitted sweater and cheery 

blue jeans 
You brinng to my mind my childhood 

scenes. 

Why are your rosy cheeks streaked with 

tears ? 
Can it be the burden of all your years? 
You surely aren't more than three and 

a half — 
Just at the age to frolic and laugh. 

You want some candy and a stick of 

gum? 
Heavens! that shouldn't require any 

great sum. 
I've two pennies here in my purse, I 

believe — 
So there, little boy, don't you bother to 

grieve. 

Loretta Smith, '33 



WELL, I'LL BE 

jyjARTY O'Toole, six feet four inches 
tall, half as wide, and twice as 
thick, swayed gently in his tracks as he 
gazed pensively at the window just 
eight and one half feet from the two 
massive extremities of his frame, which 
on ordinary mortals are usually called 
feet. For the past two weeks Marty had 
moved about the job in a trance since 
his first glimpse of the very attractive 
occupant of the room into which this 
window opened, had registered on his 
portion of a mind and left an achy, yet 
tingling sensation in the upper left-hand 
section of his torso. 

It was getting rather late and she 
usually showed up by nine o'clock. 
Marty sighed dejectedly. The voice of 
Callahan, four stories below, brought 
him out of his semi-conscious state. 

"Hey, you big gorilla, we ain't paying 
you eight bucks a day to pose as a lily 
of the valley. Come to and earn your 
dough." 

Marty, who had signaled for rivets 
from his helper, sidled over a couple 
more feet, directly over Callahan, and 
said, "Aw, take your job and — Wow! — 
Ow!— Halp!" 

Now it's an indisputable fact that a 
white hot rivet dropped into a hip pocket 
may prove decidedly uncomfortable. 
Marty evidently found it so. With an 



28 



THE PILGRIM 



agonized yell he "took off" into the 
great open spaces. Then, realizing his 
mistake, he clutched frantically at the 
nearest object and hung on desperately. 
By this time the rivet had burned its 
way through his heavy overalls, a little 
beneath its point of entrance. 

Marty's first thought was that, if he 
lived through this, he would eat from 
the mantle and be courteous to ladies in 
subways for a long time. His next dis- 
covery was that he had grabbed the win- 
dow-sill of his secret idol and that he 
was hanging from the sill by the grace 
of God and the vice-like grip of his own 
two hands. 

The window above his head shot up. 
She was there. Breathlessly she gasped, 
"Are you hurt — can you get up — shall I 
call the fire department — oh ! what shall 
I do?" 

Marty beamed at her. "I'm O. K., 
lady. Soon's I get me breath I'll be in 
to see ya." 

With a mighty heave he slid pain- 
fully across the window-sill. Turning, 
he gazed thoughtfully at the great, 
yawning abyss which he had just hurd- 
led, then down into Callahan's amazed 
face. He shut the window and turned 
to his still-flustered hostess. 

"Funny what a guy can do with the 
right inspiration," offered Marty. 

"What do you mean?" she queried. 

"Well, I been lookin' over here for 
quite a while and I didn't see you so I 
just dropped over." 

"Why, what on earth," — the girl 
ctarted in amazement. 

"You were late, wasn't you?" Marty 
grinned. 

"Why, er — yes. My little boy was 
rather out of sorts and — " 

"What! you married?" demanded 
Marty. 

"Yes, of course." 

"Ow, "groaned Marty sinking into a 
chair, and "Wow!" as he realized his 
error. 

"Oh, you are hurt, aren't you?" she 
asked. 

"Well, I got an awful burn on — yeah, 
I sure got an awful burn," Marty re- 
plied as he ambled to the window. Lean- 
ing out he yelled, 
"Hey! Callahan!" 

"Yeah?" 

"Am I fired?" 

"Naw." 

He balanced for a moment on the win- 
dow ledge. The girl shrilled at him, 
"Don't, for heaven's sake !" 

With all the precision of a cricket, al- 
though he more closely resembled a bull 



moose, Marty sprang, alighted, wavered, 
gained his precarious perch, and shuf- 
fled over to his work. 

Leaning over, he glared down at his 
helper. 

"Rivets hot?" 

"Sure, boss." 

"Push 'em up." 

Gilbert Harlow, '33 

THE HANDS OF TIME 

She stood before the clock 
And thought: 

"The hands of Time! 

These are the hands 

That tell off 

The years and eternities ; 

The numbered moments 

Of Man's life — 

His sorrows, joys, 

Loves and hates — 

His victories and defeats ! 

In the next year, or the next hour, 

The next minute — yes, 

Even the next second — 

Hands of Time, 

Who knows what you 

Will bring to me?" 

C harlotte B urgess, '33 

EMBARKATION 

By God's will we've reached the shore- 
line 
Of the great expanse beyond, 
And our bark will be all ready 
'Fore another day has dawned. 

Hark! tempestuous waves are crashing 
On the hidden rocks below. 
Can we steer our precious vessel 
Through them, safely — ? Who can 
know? 

Now we start, ship strewn with gar- 
lands, 
Cheers the crowd, — our anchor's free — 
Will our courage — then — be steadfast 
Lone and rocked on darkened sea? 

When we're tossed by cruel billows, 
When we're plunged in deep abyss, 
When our trusted friends forsake us, 
Can our ship combat with this? 

God, we hope our ship is sturdy, 
For we've tried to build it so, 
And with Your kind blessing on us 
Fully armored shall we go. 

M. E . Whiting, '33 

The novice at trout fishing had hooked a 
very small trout. Excitedly he played it, reel- 
ing it in after a moment or two until it was 
rammed tight against the end of the rod. 
Glowing with the warmth of conquest, he 
turned to his instructor. 

"I've got him! I've got him!" he cried. "Now 
what do I do?" 

"Climb up the pole and stab him to death," 
replied the disgusted instructor. 



THE PILGRIM 



29 



THE EPOCH MAKER 

"Good afternoon, gentlemen; I sup- 
pose you're reporters. Am I right? No? 
Well, at any rate, I know you want 
me to tell you about my great feat of 
engineering. 

"Have a seat — pardon me — do you see 
my armchairs anywhere? — Well, I guess 
the office boy took them home with him. 
Never mind, perhaps there's room for 
you on that bench. 

"I've always believed it could be done. 
It was one of my boyhood dreams. 
Everyone, when I applied for financial 
assistance, said it was a crazy idea, but 
I've done it, gentlemen, I've done it! 
Three months ago America was con- 
nected to Asia only by steamships ply- 
ing back and forth, but now the two 
continents are closely linked together by 
a bridge one hundred and fifty miles 
long reaching from Cape Prince of 
Wales in to East Cape in Asia ! It is a 
superhuman accomplishment, gentle- 
men, the product of a genius who — but 
please, please, gentlemen, spare me this 
embarrassment, for I still retain the 
modesty which was my most becoming 
characteristic in my childhood days. 

"Other great engineers have made it 
a practice to start on the shore and build 
towards the center of the span, but I 
started at the center and worked to- 
wards the shore as well. The bridge is 
made of wood for a very good reason. 
Wood, as you may know, floats, so I 
built sections of the bridge on the shore, 
towed them out and weighted these sec- 
tions down with rocks. Of course the 
ballast clutters up the top of the bridge 
somewhat, but nothing is perfect. 

"One of my worst setbacks was ex- 
perienced when we were putting the 
third section in. When we weighted it 
down, it sank into the mud until its sur- 
face was fifty feet below the level of the 
rest of the bridge. That difficulty was 
readily overcome by installing escalators 
at both ends of that section. 

"Just before I left we had a cold spell 
and the bridge in contracting drew a- 
part in the middle. I had my men put 
a few planks across the gap, so that no 
one would be annoyed by it, and we 
have only to lift those planks up to allow 
boats to pass through the Straits. 

"What? You must be going? Well, 
come again when I can take the time 
to talk to you. Good-bye. 

"Warden, can't I play Napoleon now? 
I'm tired of being an engineer, and be- 
sides, I've lost my Erector. I may? Oh, 
goody, goody!" 

Howard Sherman, '33 



WHAT A NIGHT! 

gUSINESS had been dull. Not many 
people were on the street. At the 
tenth stroke of the clock in Town 
Square, Katherine decided to close shop. 
Stretching out a lanquid hand, she 
pressed the two buttons which controlled 
the lights in the back of the store. She 
walked slowly to the cash register. One 
of her duties was to count the money 
and check the charges. 

Her thoughts wandered as she stood 
there. The novel she had just finished — 
a good story but the plot was impossible. 
"Bearded Bandits" was an inviting 
title — it suggested daring, romantic ad- 
ventures. The only men she knew with 
beards were as old as the hills and as 
romantic as a Uriah Heep. Where, oh, 
where were the Don Quixotes and Robin 
Hoods of her generation? 

She looked up suddenly. She knew 
someone was looking at her. Her hands 
tightened on the bills she held. Two 
huge men were gazing through the win- 
dow at her. Neatly trimmed, curly, 
brown beards ornamented the lower 
part of their faces. Dark felt hats 
pulled low over their faces did not con- 
ceal their enormous, glowing eyes. 
Surely, they were as large as half-dol- 
lars ! After what seemed to be a hurried 
consultation, the men went away. 

She breathed a sigh of relief — too 
soon ! One of them entered. He walked 
past towards the tables. Her heart stood 
still — then raced on madly. She gulped 
and gave the prescribed, 

"Can I do something for you?" 

"Yes. I'd like coffee and sandwiches, 
please." 

Oh, horrors ! She was the only one in 
the store. She was afraid to leave him 
alone there. Mr. Jones next door had 
closed and was gone. Officer Riley 
wouldn't be back for a half-hour. 
Visions of a hold-up — maybe she'd be 
shot — those thieves in the book — 

"I'm sorry, but — " 

"The sign says you serve until ten- 
thirty. It's only ten now." 

"You see—" 

What could she say? Not that she was 
alone ! Desperately, she snatched a 
straw — 

"We have no bread left. I can give 
you coffee and pastries, though." 

The bell which summoned the man 
who worked downstairs caught her eye. 
When they forced her, trembling, de- 
fiant — to give them the money in the 
register, she would press the bell with 
her knee. She could see the headlines — 
that handsome, new reporter would in- 



30 



THE PILGRIM 



terview her — her picture would be on 
the front page of the paper — "Daring 
Herione Aids in Capture of Interna- 
tional Criminals" — but no one was 
downstairs ! He'd left at five ! 

"Well, I'll have a cup of coffee, any- 
way." 

He stood at the counter, sipping it 
slowly. Would he never finish it? 
Whence had his companion disap- 
peared? 

"Ten minutes past ten. You'll be open 
ten or twenty minutes longer, won't 
you?" 
"Yes." 

"Good Night." 
"Good Night." 

With a last, searching look at the 
shop, he turned and left. 

She made a frantic dive for the door 
and locked it behind him. A quick 
change of costume and she was ready to 
leave. 

An anxious survey of the street re- 
assured her. THEY were nowhere in 
sight ! Her fears had been foolish ! The 
man had been hungry and his com- 
panion, not. 

That was the solution. Murder 
mysteries and glaring tabloids did 
queer things to the imagination. 

The tall, street light cast gruesome 
shadows. Still no people on the streets. 
Head down, hands in her pocket, she 
dashed across the street. Suddenly she 
stopped short. In a Ford parked op- 
posite the store were the two, bearded 
strangers. They stared fixedly at it. 
A tremor of fear passed over her. There 
was one thing left to do — and she did 
it! She hadn't been on the track team 
in vain. 

As she ran along, her pulses pounding 
furiously, she thought it over. Would 
they break into the store? Were they 
thieves? Why had they stopped there? 
She said nothing to anyone, for she 
realized how absurd her story would 
sound. Still, for many weeks, despite 
the fact that nothing had happened, she 
wondered about the men. Who were 
they? What had they been doing in 
Blankville? 

Loretta Smith, '33 



Jimmy's father found him in the barn. He 
was shaking his pet rabbit and saying: "Five 
and five! How much is five and five?" 

"Jimmy, Jimmy, what does this mean?" his 
father demanded. "Why," said Jimmy, 
"teacher told us rabbits multiply rapidly, but 
this dumbbell can't even add!" 



The following four stanzas are an 
original translation taken from "Le 
Lac," a poem by Lamartine, well-known 
French poet of the nineteenth century. 

THE LAKE 

(Verses 6, 7, 8, 9) 
6. 

hours divine, and fleeting time, 
Pray, cease your rapid flight! 
Allow us, pray, on our happiest days 
To dream in your sublime delight ! 

7. 
Enough of sorrow, all implore you ; 
Grant their simple quest ; 
Days of care, for them pray spare 
A quiet, peaceful rest. 

8. 
In vain I plead a few short moments' 

leave, 
But time escapes in flight ; 

1 ask this eve, " Your time retrieve?" 
But dawn dispels the night. 

9. 
Then love, then love divine, we now en- 
twine 
Sweet joy, as one short hour flees on; 
Man has no trend, time hath no end, 
It glides away as we pass on. 

Marjorie Cassidy, '33 



ON CAPE COD 

Stillness of night, 

Gleam of a star, 
Beam of a lighthouse, 

Glimpsed from afar ; 
Glory of dawn, 

Sun on the sands, 
Windmills turning 

Their gigantic hands ; 
Blue of the ocean, 

Cranberries red, 
Gulls soaring upward, 

White clouds o'erhead ; 
Placid and peaceful, 

Thank thee, Lord, 
For this quaint land 

Known as Cape Cod. 



Jeannette Martin, '34 



First passenger on Atlantic liner: "You 
know I am a literary person. I have contrib- 
uted to the Atlantic Monthly." 

Second ditto: "You have nothing on me. On 
this trip I have contributed to the Atlantic 
daily." 



A private was standing in the company 
street, outside his tent, shaving. 

"Do you always shave outside?" asked the 
sergeant. 

"Of course," answered the private. "What 
do you think I am — fur-lined?" 



THE PILGRIM 



31 



In&er tbr Mtjite (Cupola 



i 



SCHOOL NEWS 

'""THE Pilgrim" this year takes the 
form of a Senior Year Book. This 
column, therefore, will be a review of 
the year's happenings to date. 

Class activities began, as usual, with 
the election of officers. 
The presidents are : 

Class of 1933 Gilbert Harlow 

Class of 1934 Joseph Stefani 

Class of 1935 Albert Padovani 

The Class of Nineteen Thirty-three 
started its senior year by giving a dance 
early in November. This was very suc- 
cessful and well attended. 

Then on Friday evening, April 
seventh, the Senior Class presented a 
one-act play, "The Valiant", in the small 
hall in the Memorial Building. The pro- 
ceeds are to be used toward defraying 
the cost of this issue. The hall was 
crowded, and each and every one who at- 
tended appreciated the work that must 
have been necessary to the presentation 
of such a finished product. Dancing 
followed in the large hall, with music 
by Volta's Orchestra. 

In spite of the crowded conditions in 
the morning session, we have had many 
unusual assemblies. Early last fall, 
Miss Dorothy Goodenough, who was not 
long ago a teacher here, since then a 
teacher in the American College for 
Girls in Athens, gave a most interesting 
talk on her experiences in Greece. 

Milton J. Schlagenhauf of North- 
eastern University, and Mr. Weasley 
of Burdett College have each spoken to 
us on college and our life work. At an- 
other assembly Mr. Squires of Boston 
showed us some unusually interesting 
slides on "Where the Oregon Flows." 
The boys of the school have also had an 
assembly of their own, at which Mr. 
W. H. Dunn of the Nautical School 
spoke to them. 

As an introduction to his course of 
health lectures at the Memorial Hall, 
Mr. Julius Gilbert White spoke to us at 
one assembly. His interesting lecture 
aroused in many of us a new interest in 
health. 

Another very interesting talk was 
given by Professor Bartlett of the His- 
tory Department, Tufts College, con- 
cerning the value and cost of education. 

Our own orchestra played for one 
assembly in February. Despite the fact^ 
that its numbers were greatly de-- 



creased by the epidemic of colds it 
gave a very interesting concert. Mr. 
Shipman has given us a series of short 
assemblies, in each of which he has 
stressed a point of importance in our 
school work. 

The boys in the operetta missed an al- 
together different assembly at which 
Mr. Hendry, father of our new domes- 
tic science teacher, showed us many of 
his paintingss with which he illustrated 
some of the requisites of a good picture. 

From Duxbury have come two fine 
speakers. The first was Mrs. Daven- 
port who spoke to the Senior Class on 
the life and works of Gilbert Stuart, 
the famous man who painted George 
Washington's portrait. Later Mr. Sey- 
mour spoke to us concerning the life of 
Shakespeare, including in his talk some 
of his own personal experiences while 
acting in Shakespeare's dramas. 

The honor society took charge of an- 
other assembly, at which new members 
were initiated. The new members are: 
Seniors — Iris Albertini, Victoria 
Brewer, Ferdinand Fiocchi, Evelyn 
Johns, John Santos. 

Juniors — Florence Armstrong, 
Marjorie Belcher, Ruth Buttner, Shirley 
Dutton, Jeannette Martin, Robert Mar- 
tin, Josephine Montinari, William Brew- 
ster. 

Following the plan started last year 
at Christmas, every home room in the 
school filled a Christmas box for a poor 
family. These boxes, which were deliv- 
ered on the Friday before the holiday, 
brought joy to many families. 

The Christmas assembly this year was 
in charge of Mrs. Raymond's Junior 
English class. Miss Margaret Kyle gave 
a Christmas reading which was followed 
by a tableau vivant of "The First Christ- 
mas." 

Although the results of the games 
were not so successful as we could have 
wished, this year's football season was 
very exciting and well worth the at- 
tendance of all football fans. 

There has been no Student Council 
this year, but five members of the Junior 
Class attended a Student Council Con- 
ference at Durfee High School in Fall 
River. From the enthusiasm which re- 
sulted may come a revival of Student 
Council next year. 

Realizing our need of a school publi- 
cation, two Juniors, Robert Martin and 
Carlo Guidoboni, have taken it upon 



82 



THE PILGRIM 



themselves to relieve this need, and are 
publishing a "Junior Pilgrim". The one 
issue which has as yet been printed, was 
received with great enthusiasm by the 
student body. 

The members of the boys' basketball 
team have had a successful season, win- 
ning a large majority of the games. Al- 
though they lost the Brockton Tourna- 
ment, Mansfield, the winner, does not 
take the cup permanently, and we shall 
have another chance next year. The 
girls' team went through the season un- 
defeated. For this achievement, the 
members of the first team were given 
small gold basketballs. 

Miss Wilber's Latin Club held an all- 
day picnic at Manter's Point last 
October. The club also held a Christmas 
Party just before Christmas in the 
Lincoln Street School. At this time the 
Freshman Latin classes presented a 
short play and gifts were exchanged. 
The serving of refreshments closed a 
most enjoyable evening. 

The Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, 
"Pirates of Penzance," was successfully 



produced in Memorial Hall on April 
twenty-eighth to an audience of most 
enthusiastic music-lovers. Much credit 
should go to Mr. Wooley, to Mrs. Buck, 
and to Miss Locklin as well as to all 
members of the cast. 

The ticket-selling campaign was like- 
wise a success. Competition between 
teams was great. The winning team was 
captained by Warren Sampson and 
Elizabeth Wood. Paul Warnsman, E. 
Manzotti, and M. Regal are the cham- 
pion ticket sellers in the school. 

Many pupils are looking forward to 
the two coming social events of the 
school, the Freshman Dance, scheduled 
for the fifth of May, and the Junior 
Prom, planned for one week later on the 
twelfth. Committees are at work plan- 
ning for both of these occasions, and 
we expect as enjoyable and successful 
evenings as in past years. 

Now we must say "Auf Wiedersehen" 
until next year. 

Marjorie S. Belcher 
Harvey E. Barke 




PILGRIM STAFF 



Left to Right: Smiled, Marjorie Belcher, Florence Armstrong, Ruby Johnson, Iris Albertini, 

Loretta Smith, Miriam GifFord, Evelyn Johns, Shirley Uutton 
Left to Right: Standing, Dorothy Tcstoni, Harvey Barke, Jane Matheson, Margaret Whiting, 

Enzo Bongiovanni, Gilbert Andrews, William Brewster, Kenneth Tingley, Leroy Shreiber 



THE PILGRIM 



33 




GIRLS' SPORTS 

Hockey 

The hockey season opened with sev- 
eral of last year's players in the line- 
up. Because of Mrs. Garvin's careful 
grooming, the team was able to hold its 
own throughout the season. Seven 
games were played with out-of-town 
teams. Our victories numbered five, and 
there were two games which ended in a 
tie. 

Marked improvement was noted in 
the playing of Marion Zandi, Bertha 
James, and "Gus" Cappella, while Leah 
Alberghini lived up to her last year's 
reputation. 

Below is the schedule of games 
played, with the final score : 



Team 


Place 


Scores 


Scituate 


here 


1-0 


Bourne 


there 


1-1 


Kingston 


here 


2-1 


Hyannis 


there 


0-0 


Bourne 


here 


2-0 


Kingston 


there 


1-0 


Hyannis 


here 
Basketball 


1-0 



The girls' basketball team remained 
undefeated throughout the season for 
the second consecutive year, and as a 
reward the school presented the girls 
with gold basketballs, each ball bearing 
the name and position of the player. 

Bertha James and Leah Alberghini 
were high scorers, and a sophomore, 
Helen Brewer, made a very capable 
center. 

Of the six games played, the most in- 
teresting was the home game with 
Bridgewater, which, as you will see 
from the chart following, nearly ended 
in a tie score. 



Team 


Place 


Scores 


Rockland 


there 


30-22 


Hingham 


here 


44-16 


Bridgewater 


here 


26-24 


Rockland 


here 


36-19 


Bridgewater 


there 


35-26 


Hingham 


there 


42-21 



Track 

Track practice is well under way a- 
gain, and with such stars as Bertha 
James and Leah Alberghini in the field, 
the Plymouth girls should carry off their 
share of honors this year. 

Baseball 

Baseball on a larger scale is the plan 
this year. The girls are to have their 
first baseball team, and inter-class 
games are being organized. 

Tennis 

Although tennis has not yet started 
because of the condition of the court, 
plans for a tournement have been com- 
pleted, and many names have been re- 
ceived from those desirous of entering 
the contest. 

Play Day 

Plans are also being completed for a 
grand play day to be held here at Plym- 
outh, with members of other schools as 
our guests. 

An invitation to attend has been ex- 
tended to every member of the high 
school. 

Personals 

And so we ramble on — 
To say that 
Perhaps we're wrong but we think 
Rosa had something to tell B. L. about 
that Bridgewater game ! Was she in- 
terested ? 

And why is Enzo so popular? Inquire 
of Helen Pirani for further details. 

Is it still "Tommy, Tommy, Tommy"? 

"If we could be one hour with you to- 
night" — 

Bertha and her impersonations of 
B. P. 

And very collegiate, but how artistic? 
Blue rompers 
Orange stockings 
Green ski suit 

Walter Winchell should take lessons 
from one Dorothy we know ! 

Oh, fudge ! Guess who — 

Is it still Judy? 

Who's that nonchalant player? Yea, 
Rosa ! 



34 



THE PILGRIM 



If frankness is a virtue, Miss C. — ! 

A regular football-basketball player! 
Ask Gus Sonnenberg for advice, Miss 
E. B. 

Jus plain gum! Ooodles of it! 

Ask Esther how the basketball feels — 
she had a monopoly on it. 

That broad expanse! Bertha will 



elucidate. 

Meet "A Posture"! 

Edna Wallace Hopper — new style ! 

And it's all in the spirit of fun, with 
no offense meant to anyone. 

Cheer up, girls, for there'll be a new 
editor next year. 

Ruby L. Johnson 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

Left to Right: Seated, Teresa Govi, Dorothy Testoni, Hazel Clark, Leah Alberghini, 
Captain; Anna O'Brien, Barbara Proll'etty 
Left to Right: Standing, Mrs. Garvin, Coach; Charlotte Millner, Rosa DesLauriers, Ruth 
Gardner, Helen Brewer, Bertha James, Eleanor Bradford, Augusta Cappella 




GIRLS' HOCKEY TEAM 

Left to Right: Seated, Hazel Clark, Dorothy Testoni, Ruby Johnson, Leah Alberghini, 

Florence Donovan, Barbara Proll'etty 
Left to Right: Standing, Alma Guidetti, Marion Zandi, Ruth Buttner, Bertha James, Mrs. 

Garvin, Coach ; Ruth Gardner, Anna O'Brien, Teresa Govi, Augusta Cappella 



THE PILGRIM 



IN RETROSPECT 
1932—33 

J^OOKING over the year's achievements 
in athletics, we find that Plymouth 
High has enjoyed a very successful sea- 
son in all sports to date. 

The football team won the majority 
of the games scheduled. Captain Walker, 
Bussolari, Ferri, Fiocchi, Berg, Gellar, 
Raymond, Tingley, Hughes, and Bon- 
giovanni will be lost to the team through 
graduation. 

With the closing v/histle of the Plym- 
outh-Weymouth tussle, the scholastic 
football career of Judy Walker, one of 
the greatest all-round football players 
in the history of our school, drew to 
a close. Here's to you, Judy. 

The basketball season, from the point 
of attendance and finances, was the 
most prosperous one in the history of 
the game in our school. The team suf- 
fered but two defeats in scheduled 
games and came within an ace of reach- 
inng the finals in the South Shore tourn- 



35 



ament. 

Ferioli, Zaniboni, Walker, and co- 
captains Bussolari and Bongiovanni 
have played their last game for Plym- 
outh High, but with Strassel, James, 
Goodwin, Roncarati, Rogers, Cavicchi, 
Ryan, and several other very promising 
players returning, things do not look 
exactly cloudy on the basketball horizon. 

As this publication goes to press, 
Plymouth High has vanquished Abing- 
ton in both track and baseball. 
The track team took a 53 to 33 ver- 
dict with Walker and Bussolari starring 
for Plymouth. 

The baseball team, with Bussolari on 
the mound, copped a 4 to 2 decision. 
Bussolari yielded four hits while Fuller 
was found for six. "Creeper" James 
was the individual star both afield and 
at bat. 

A ten-game schedule has been arrai- 
gned for the tennis team which swings 
into action May 11, with Hingham as 
guests. 




FOOTBALL TEAM 

Fibst Row: Left to right, Tony Lawrence, Jack Guimares, Arthur Raggazini, Frank Mello, 
Alonzo James, Kenneth Tingley 

Shcond Row: Left to right, Thomas Roncarati, Arthur Hughes, Nando Bussolari, Geno Ferri, 
Peter Gellar, Justin Walker, Captain; Ferdinand Fiocchi, Enzo Bongiovanni, Alden Ray- 
mond, Milton Berg, Warren Sampson 

Left TO Right: Standing, Andrew Guerra, Manager; Coach, Bagnall; George Costa, Andrew 
Hasler, Vincent Neri, Gilhert Andrews, James Clark, Joseph Stel'aui, Olindo Borghesani, 
Win. Ke.tch.en, Clemento Romano, Francis Lavache, Alonzo Canning, Ass'l. Manager 



86 



THE PILGRIM 




BASKETBALL TEAM 

Left to Right: Standing, Leno Zaniboni, Bradford Martin, Dunham Rogers, Arthur Strassel, 
Thomas Mitchell, Charles Ryan, Adolph Cavicchi, Thomas Roncorati, Mr. Smith 

Left to Right: Sitting, Harold Clark, Ralph Goodwin, Justin Walker, Nando Bussolari, 
Enzo Bongiovanni, Peter Ferioli, Alonzo James, John Guimares 




MASSASOIT CHAPTER, NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Left to Right: First Row, Josephine Montinari, Shirley Button, Dorothy Testoni, Evelyn 

Johns, Jcannette Martin 
Left to Right: Second Row, Iris Alhertini, Edith Halberg, Milton Berg, Miss Brown, Gilbert 

Harlow, Loretta Smith, Marjorie Cassidy 
Left to Right: Third Row, Victoria Brewer, Marjorie Belcher, Florence Armstrong, Ruth 

Buttner, William Brewster, John Santos, Robert Martin, Ferdinand Fiocchi 



THE PILGRIM 




FOREIGN* 
LANGUAGES 




VIVE LE FRANQAIS! 

Voulez-vous aller en France un jour 
avec nous? Aimeriez-vous visiter la 
belle ville historique de Paris et voir 
l'eglise majestueuse de Notre Dame? 
Mais Paris n'est pas toute la France. 
Alors, allons en Bretagne. Certaine- 
ment vous voudriez parcourir les vieilles 
provinces avec leurs scenes pittoresques 
et leurs habitants interessants ? Ecou- 
tons les histoires racontees par un pay- 
san courbe. D'ici, allons en Alsace voir 
les champs de bataille ou sont tombes 
tant de soldats pendant la Grande 
Guerre. II y a beaucoup de places a 
visiter et beaucoup de choses a voir. 
La France est un pays de souvenirs ! 

Pcuvez-vous comprendre ce que dit 
cet vieil homme qui s'est habille d'un 
veston brun, avec un grand chapeau, 
brievement, en costume complete d'un 
fermier champetre. II nous parle des 
jours deja passes quand les rois ont 
gouverne sa patrie. Tout cela vous sera 
utile quand vous etudierez l'histoire 
d'Europe — mais seulement si vous sa- 
vez la langue f rancaise ! 

Tout le monde aime un savant, 
la France. Voulez-vous nous joindre en 
disant, "Vive le francais?". 

Evelyn Johns, '33 



le 13 mars, 1933. 
Ma chere Marie: 

Pardonnez-rnoi mon long silence. Je 
voulais vous ecrire plus tot, mais la 
Corse m'intrigue et je n' ai pas trouve 
le temps. En ecrivant cette lettre, je 
suis dans un train en route a Bastia. 

Mais commencons au commencement. 
Apres avoir quitte la France, mon pere 
et moi, nous sommes venus a la Corse, 
comme vous le savez. Vous ne pouvez 
pas soupconner mon hilarite et grande 
surprise quand nous sommes entres 
dans le golfe d'Ajaccio. II est superbe — 
bleu comme celui de Naples, mais plus 



beau. Les He Sanguinaires qu'on voit en 
entrant dans la baie sont un rouge in- 
imaginable. Et au loin, on apercoit les 
montagnes qui montent au ciel. 

Ajaccio est une ville originalle et 
differente. Cette ville est silente et 
solemne comme Test toute la Corse. 
Elle est frequentee par beaucoup d' 
Anglais et de Norvegiens. Comme 
vous le savez, sans doute, Ajaccio est 
la ville ou est ne Napoleon. Si on ne le 
sait pas, on l'apprendrait bientot apres 
son arrivee dans cette ville parce qu'il y 
a beaucoup de monuments, de statues 
et de musees dedies au Napoleon. En 
effet — tout est Napoleon ! 

Une des premieres places que j'ai 
visitee etait la maison cle Napoleon. 
C'est une veille maison et personne n'y 
demeure. Toutes les chambres sont de- 
meublees. II n'y a rien maintenant que 
les tapisseries. 

Aussitot que je suis arrivee en Corse, 
je voulais apprendre de ses coutumes. 
Je suis sure qu'ils vous interessent. 
Premierement — ses superstitions. Les 
insulaires croient qu'il y a des 
vampires quiaiment a tourmenter les en- 
fants. On peut se defendre de ces vam- 
pires en portant une amulette. Les 
Corses sont un peuple triste. Quand on 
meurt, toute sa famille le deplore long- 
temps. Si on est assassine, quelque 
parent doit le venger. 

Cela me rapelle la vendetta. Tout le 
monde sait que la Corse est le retraite 
des bandits. Le maquis, au centre de 
l'ile, est un tres bon refuge pour ces 
bandits et, malgre leurs efforts, les gen- 
darmes francais ne peuvent pas les cap- 
tiver. Les Corses, bien qu'il soient rudes 
et grossiers, sont tres polis parce que 
cette ile a beaucoup d'ecoles. 

Toutes ces choses j'ai apprises quand 
j'etais a Ajaccio. A cause de la chaleur 
intense, tout le monde dort dans l'apres- 
midi. C'est a dire, tons, sauf les etrang- 
ers, comme moi, par example, qui 
veulent voir la ville. 



38 



THE PILGRIM 



Apres deux jours remplis de nouvelles 
experiences, mon pere et moi, nous 
avons decide a aller a Bastia, la capitale 
de la Corse. Et maintenant, comme nous 
voyageons a toute vitesse vers Bastia 
j'obtiens une vue fugitive des scenes 
magnifiques de l'interieur. 

Ne tardez pas trop a me donner de 
vos nouvelles. 

Bien affecteusement a vous 
Dot 
Dorothy Testoni, '33 

LE VOYAGE DE MONSIEUR 
PERRICHON 

M. Perrichon, pere de famille, 

Avec Henriette, sa seule fille, 

Et sa femme, une dame d'esprit, 

Pour la Mer de Glace est parti. 

Deux jeunes hommes de bon naissance 

Aussi sont alles — pas par chance. 

Armand Desroches et Daniel Savary — 

lis sont tombes amoureux de cette fille. 

Par la France et la Suisse, aussi 

Le deux jeunes hommes l'ont suivie. 

A la Mer de Glace, M. Perrichon 

Etait sauve par le bon garcon, 

Le courageux ! Ah ! le brave Armand 

Un homme de coeur, tres charmant ! 

(Mais l'autre a beaucoup de genie.) 

M. Perrichon a sauve Savary! ! 

Apres des embarras avec douanier 

Armand encore lui a aide. 

Le pere de famille en trouble s'est mis 

Avec un zouave du premier parti, 

Un homme d'honneur, Commandant 

Mathieu 
(Quelle bonne heure! Le duel n'avait 
pas lieu!) 
Armand et Daniel veulent se marier 

avec cette fille, 
La seule enfant de la jolie famille! 
La mere et Henriette aiment Armand 
Mais le pere aime l'autre tant — 
Heureusement le destin intervient 
Pour finir cette piece enfin. 
Avec une fin tres charmante 
Henriette a pour mari, le cher Armand 
Loretta Smith, '33 

SON "BOY FRIEND" FRANCAIS 

Vous plairait-il de voir votre corres- 
pondant francais, surtout si vous etiez 
une jeune fille americaine qui ecrivait a 
un gargon frangais? 

Peut-etre vous vous demandez — Une 
fille americaine? Un garcon frangais? 

Bien entendu, le professeur n'a pas 
donne a Nancy Brown le nom d'un gar- 
con, mais Miss Nancy avait demande a 
son ami Tom le nom d'un de ses corres- 
pondants francais. Voila pourquoi Miss 
Nancy ecrivait a M. Andre Boulanger. 

Mais pour continuer. C 'etait avec joie 
que Miss Nancy lisait la lettre qu'elle 



avait regue ce jour-meme d' Andre Bou- 
langer, age de dix-neuf ans. M. Boulan- 
ger allait entrer dans l'Universite de 
Paris le septembre prochain, mais, 
avant de commencer ses etudes a cette 
universite celebre, il allait faire un voy- 
age aux Etats-Unis. Dans sa lettre il 
disait qu'il arriverait a New York le 
10 juillet, sur 1' "Ile-de-France". 

Avec impatience elle attendait les 
vacances. Mais enfin les vacances 
sont arrivees! Bientot c'etait le quinze 
juillet. Ce matin-la le soleil rayonnait 
sur le tapis de la chambre de Miss Nancy 
. . . Les oiseux chantaient et tout avait 
un air joyeux. C'etait le jour qu'Andre 
devait arriver a Boston. D'ailleurs, 
elle avait achete une jolie robe et des 
nouveaux souliers. a deux heures elle 
etait toute prete a aller a la gare. Selon 
l'indicateur des chemins de fer, le train 
arriverait a deux heures et demie, mais 
Miss Nancy etait assez en avance. 

A la gare il y avait assez de monde, 
mais elle ne voyait personne parce 
qu'elle avait les yeux fixes sur le quai 
numero 11. Elle regardait sa montre 
mille fois. Quelle joie ! Une coup de siffle 
enfin! Le coeur de Miss Nancy battait. 
Elle ne pouvait pas attendre une autre 
minute. 

Deja le train s'arretait. Les voy- 
ageurs descendaient, l'un apres l'autre — 
des hommes d'age moyen, une madame 
avec deux enfants, quelques jeunes filles, 
mais pas Andre! Que faire? Peut-etre 
elle avait manque de le voir. Peut-etre 
il n'est pas arrive, peut-etre — 

Tout de suite une voix douce — 

— Bon jour, ma cherie, comme il est 
gentil de vous voir, ma correspondante 
americaine ! 

— Que veut dire — je ne com — excusez- 
moi, balbutia Miss Nancy. 

Devant elle etait un jeune homme de 
grande taille et de belle mine, blond et 
elegant ! 

Iris Aibertini, '33 

\ FOREIGN EXCHANGE j 

'""What's yours like, Mary?" 

"Oh, mine's a 'peach'! Tall, blond, 
writes a beautiful hand — but he's only 
fourteen! How about yours?" 

"Oh, mine even signed his, 'Your 
French boy friend' !" 

Such is the astonishing conversation 
often heard in that sixty seconds or so 
before the French class. But it's really 
harmless — two girls comparing their 
new French correspondents. 

Students taking second or third year 
French are really very much interested 
in their newly-found friends across the 



THE PILGRIM 



39 



sea. A pupil gives his ten cents to Miss 
Carey, together with certain data con- 
taining name, age, hobby, and so on. 
After a few weeks he receives the name 
and address of some student of English 
in France. Each correspondent writes his 
or her letter partly in English and part- 
ly in French, so that the one to whom 
the letter is sent tests not only his ability 
to read and understand a foreign lan- 
guage, but also his ability to correct mis- 
takes made in his native language. 

Below are extracts from some of the 
most interesting letters already received 
by Elizabeth Wood and Marian Zandi. 

Villefranche le 29 Janvier, 1933. 
Chere Marion 
Mon frere a beaucoup voyage, il est 
alle dans presque tous les pays ; connait 
un peu les Etats-Unis. Mon papa et 
presque tous les francais ne sont pas 
contents des americains au sujet des 
dettes de querre; ils ne comprennent pas 
que quand l'Amerique les a conseilles 
et presque obliges de renoncer aux rep- 
arations de l'Allemagne: que l'Ameri- 
que vienne aujourd'hui reclamer toutes 
les dettes que la France lui doit. 
Votre amie 

Marie Rose Bonnet 



Paris, le 23 decembre, 1932. 
Mademoiselle 

A 19 ans je me suis engage par de- 
vancement d'appel au 21 erne regiment 
d'infanterie a Mayence en Allemagne, 
car ces territoires etaient encore occu- 
pes par 1'Armee du Rhin. J'y suis arrive 
le 16 mai 1929 et en suis parti le 12 
octobre, notre bataillon etant la prem- 
iere unite pui fut ramenee en France, a 
Chaumont (Haute Marne). J'aurais de 
beaucoup prefere rester en Allemagne 
jusqu'a la fin de mon service, car a 
1'inverse de mes camarades je trouvais 
le pays _ interessant pour lui-meme et 
pour differents avantages que nous 
avions sur les troupes stationnees en 
France. A Chaumont je fus nomine 
caporal et je dus faire 1'instruction des 
"bleus" (des nouveaux soldats). Cette 
ville n'est pas grande avec ses 15,000 
habitants et n'offre aucun interet par- 
ticulier en regard de Mayence dix fois 
plus peuplee; mon frere partit a son 
tour un an apres au 115 erne regiment 
d'artillerie lourde a Castres dans le 
midi de la France et est rentre il y a 
neuf mois. 

Actuellement nous travaillons au 
magasin, ou nous achetons, vendons, 
raccommodons, classons, rangeons, em- 
ballons, livrons des vieux livres et 
de la musique. Nous respirons in- 



evitablement beaucoup de poussieres 
et pour nous changer d'air nous 
faisons les rassortiments dans Paris 
en bicyclette. C'est ce que nous 
pref erons le plus ; se f aufiler rapidement 
entre les files d'autos, passer de justesse 
aux croisements, eviter les pietons in- 
attentif s, pulsilanimes ou peureux ; c'est 
vivre, faire un effort, se distraire de la 
foule des rues, tandis que recoudre un 
bouquin, raccomoder un morceau de 
musique, ou la classer, servir une vieille 
dame exigeante et marchandeuse et qui 
en plus declasse en cinq minutes ce qu'il 
nous faudrat plus d'une demi-heure a 
remettre en ordre ; ce n'est vraiment pas 
captivant. 

Vous allez me dire que dans tant de 
livres, nous devons lire enormement. 
Helas ce n'est pas que le desir m'en 
manque car j'aime beaucoup lire. Je 
lirai des heures entieres si je pouvais en 
trouver le temps, mais impossible. Des 
livres que j'ai choisi et mis dans mon 
easier au fur et a mesure que je les trou- 
vais, sont restes la depuis deja long- 
temps, et je ne prevoie pas quand il me 
sera possible et les commencer. 

En attendant avec impatience votre 
reponse je suis votre 

Robert Girard. 



i 



LATIN 



YOUR OPINION? 



I 



C\F the many subjects which are being 
discussed by the group of boys hik- 
ing to Frog Pond one spring day, sub- 
jects ranging from the Vasko case to the 
possible reason why the forty-eight-year 
old maid teacher at the high school had 
bobbed her hair, Latin was now under- 
going its ordeal. 

"Latin," ventured good-looking John, 
with the slightest suggestion of a sup- 
pressed sneer, "I should never bother my 
head over a thing as dead as that. As I 
see it, Latin is an impenetrable moun- 
tain of conjugations, declensions, and 
vocabularies, and as dry as those 
parched oak leaves along the road." 

I wonder how many young people 
hesitate to take Latin for any, or all, of 
John's reasons? The usefulness of Latin 
as a means of augmenting the mediocre 
vocabulary of the average person, is 
hardly debatable. Of course, one must 
learn to conjugate and decline, but can 
anything be accomplished without tools? 

But for the last point, is Latin as je- 
june as most people believe it to be? 
Decidedly not! Are Caesar's descrip- 
tions of the barbari.e Gauls, of his muti- 
nous army, and the campaigns against 



40 



THE PILGRIM 



the Helvetians and Belgians, anything 
but vivid and exciting? Has any for- 
ensic scene aroused more interest_ and 
sympathy than the picture of Cicero 
giving vent to a burst of oratory in the 
Senate and Forum, in defense of Pom- 
pey and in indignation at Verres? 
Caesar pleases the military-minded; 
Cicero, the lawyer and statesman. 

But what has Latin to offer the lover 
of nature, of sports, those to whom a 
modern novel is of compelling interest? 
Indeed, Roman writers did not forget 
them. Virgil gives as his offering to 
these people, the "Aeneid." 

In this work, the whispsering south 
wind beckoning the sailors to the sea, 
and the roaring of Mount Etna are 
heard. One sees Mount Atlas encircled 
by clouds, wearing a cloak of snow about 
his shoulders and a beard of ice. 

At the funeral games, you may be an 
eager participant or spector of various 
sports. You may be one of the oarsmen 
On the "Chimaera" and witness the 
throwing overboard of the helmsman 
by the captain, Gyas, because the former 
had been a coward when a lost moment 
hleant the loss of the prize. The distri- 
bution of prizes at the foot race will 
hold your undivided attention because 
of the controversy as to the winner, 
after foul play. You will watch with 
anxiety the boxing match between the 
conceited Dares and the aged Entellus. 

As for the addict to the modern novel, 
what is more modern than the story of 
Queen Dido's unrequited love for 
Aeneas? He arrives in Africa where 
Dido has built a kingdom, after fleeing 
from Phoenicia. She falls in love with 
Aeneas, who can not return her love 
because circumstances compel him to 
leave Africa so that he may set up a 
Kingdom in Italy and there marry 
Lavinia. Dido, forsaken and deeply 
wounded by this love affair, commits 
suicide. 

Aeneas reminds me of some persons 
who possess much egotism, although, in 
the story, he must follow the path the 
fates have outlined for him. 

Doesn't it seem to you that Latin of- 
fers more than could be expected from 
a language reputed to be "dead"? 

Iris E. Albertini, '33 



CONCERNING HUMOR 
(from the "Aneid") 

J)AME Humor, that terrible medium 
through which homes and friend- 
ships are often ruined, may be com- 
pared to an ugly bird. Small at first, 
she feeds on the names of men, never 



dieting, and gains strength rapidly, un- 
til, like a bird on the wing, she con- 
ceals her head in a dark cloud. This 
monster has as many watchful eyes as 
feathers, and as many tongues and 
listening ears! She hastens through 
space under cover of the shades of night, 
and takes her stand on a mountain top, 
cr perhaps on the roof of a turret, and 
is as often the bearer of lies as a mes- 
senger of truth. 

Nothing, nobody, is immune! 

Ruby Johnson, '33 

"ARMA VIRUMQUE CANO" 

Scene : 

The atrium of a Roman home about 
the year 40 B. C. It is poorly furn- 
ished and is obviously not a habita- 
tion of a family of wealth. The back- 
ground is deeply shadowed — strange 
forms are cast on the bare, sanded 
floor. 

At Rise: 

A young man, Publius Vergilius, is 
half-reclining on a stone couch cov- 
ered with animal skins. Deep in 
thought he is oblivious of his sur- 
roundings. In a moment he speaks. 

Vergil: The legions are leaving for a 
new expedition tomorrow. I should 
be going with them! My health, age 
and standing qualify me. All my life 
I've longed to seek new lands — scale 
the Alps with a mighty army — sub- 
due barbarians — plunder conquered 
villages ! By Jove — I believe I will — 
(He is interrupted by the abrupt en- 
trance of plump young man, Horace. ) 

Horace: Greetings! Have you heard 
the news? 

Vergil: What news? 

Horace: This very day Emperor 
Augustus issued a proclamation de- 
claring you royal historian. His first 
order is for you to make the world 
conscious of the glory of Rome. You 
are to write a history of the Empire ! 

Vergil : Perhaps I should be pleased, 
but Cornelia has refused to marry me 
until I become a soldier and bring her 
trophies from abroad. To write an 
epic will take years — should I sacri- 
fice my love, hopes, ambitions for a 
title? Time will inspire someone to 
write it far better than I could ! The 
Emperor will understand — he will re- 
lease me. 

Horace : Quitter ! Doesn't the great 
Empire mean anything to you? Well, 
I'm going — if you change your mind, 
let me know. (He leaves, upper right) 

Vergil: (Musing): It's an old story. 
Even the lowest slave knows the story 
of Romulus and Remus. I'll call on 



THE PILGRIM 



41 



Cornelia tonight and — (sharply) 
Who's there? (An old woman with 
straggling white hair falling over one 
eye, her slight form clad in soiled 
linen is bent by a sack held in her 
arms. He addresses her as she ad- 
vances from the back of the room) 
Who are you? You look like the pic- 
tures of the old Sybils but — 

Sybil : I am the messenger of your an- 
cestors' spirits. They worked very 
hard to found Latium and now YOU 
grumble because someone thinks they 
ought to get a little credit for doing 
it. 

Vergil : Yes, yes — but why should I 
spend time on tiresome facts few will 
read about? Even poetry is dead! 
Hey! What are you doing? (Sybil 
empties bag of leaves over him and 
moves towards wings.) (Turning up 
one of the leaves) Why, they're writ- 
ten on! Wait a minute! Don't go! I 
want to talk to you — 

Sybil : I must. You have visitors. (Tall, 
blond warrior strides in. He looks all 
around and goes over to the couch.) 

Vergil: Well, what do you want? Who 
are you? 

Warrior : I am looking for that un- 
grateful, lazy wretch, Vergilius Maro. 

Vergil: Ahem! Why? 

Warrior : He accused me of being slow 
— out-of-date. Do you know what I 
did at your age ? 

Vergil : No. 

Warrior : I fled from the ruins of Troy 
leading my son and carrying my 
father on my back. Together with a 
party of our friends we left for the 
promised shores of Latium. The 
horrors I witnessed — the havoc I was 
forced to see — the destruction of my 
native land ! In the burning wreck 
I left — (Small, shrewish woman has 
entered — interrupting) You left your 
wife — his own wife, mind you — just 
because he dreamed of my brother 
Hector — he just wanted another wife 
— some hussy who — 

Aeneas : Creusa ! I looked — 

Creusa : Yes, you did not 

(Tall, stately Titan enters, beauti- 
fully dressed — breaking in) 

Aeneas : Dido ! 

You were looking for me, weren't 
you, dear? Adventure — love — ro- 
mance — a faded shrew could never 
hold you — Aeneas, my pet — (A beau- 
tiful brunette enters) 
Your pet! Huh — it only took him a 
year to get tired of you. He killed a 



king to win my love — he wanted me 

all the time — his Lavinia ! 

(Old man enters, leading a young 

boy) 

Aeneas : Father — Acestes 

Old Man : You are wrong, all of you — 
he left to make a home for me. 

All : Wrong again, Anchises, you were 
too old to live very long. What did a 
month more or less matter? 

Aeneas: Just a minute. You are all 
mistaken I — (Sybil reappears, starts 
to gather up the leaves. As she picks 
them up, the characters disappear) 

Vergil : Don't take them. I'll write it. 

Sybil : Yes. You'll write it — and you'll 
be the greatest poet Rome will ever 
have, but one thing will happen — you 
shall never complete your epic. Thus 
will you be punished — (Disappears) 

Vergil : Silly old woman — I must have 
imagined it all. Still — it is a wonder- 
ful idea. My scrolls — I must begin at 
once — 

CURTAIN 



EST VICTOR! 

Est victor ! In R5mam cum gloria venit, 

Sua gloria ab populis canebatur. 

Est victor! dicunt, "Magnas nationes 

vicit," 
Heros Rornae, dominus temporis; est 

victor ! 
Est victor ! in suo pectore est magnus 

triumphus, 
Et ei laudCs cum superbia canebant. 
Est victor ! vir, fortis et superbus 

vacatus ; 
Heros Romae, dominus temporis, est 

victor ! 

THE LAST CHORD 

Oroheus, we call on thee to lead 

This Symphony of '33. 

Our sonata, of four parts composed, 

Has been arranged for us, 

The orchestra, our class ; 

With string and wood-wind and the 

brass, 
Our deeds, our sorrows, joys and hopes, 
In memory we softly play 
The varied moods of our sonata ; 
The Aspiration, our first year, 
With hopes and dreams prepared us 
For the second — that serious year 
Of Meditation — sophistication ! 
Ah, the third, a year of Humor — the 

scherzo, 
Minuetto, dance, too soon gave way 
To our last movement — the finale, 
A vein of triumphant joyousness: 
Ah, list, as now we play 
The last chord of our Triumph — 
Commencement Day! 

Iris Albertini '33 



42 


THE PILGRIM 




i 


ALUMNI NOTES 


! 
! 



WHO'D 'UV THUNK IT 

^HAT to write?! How to begin—? 
H'm — Let's see — "While jaunting 
through the old town"— NO. NO, NO! 
"Looking back through the years" — oh, 
pshaw! Ignoring preliminaries, this is, 
presumably, an Alumni Column, so 
down to work and years. — Let's take 
the years 1927 and '28. 

Looking through the varied prophe- 
cies of Karl Bittinger, of the Class of 
1927, I find he was a little wrong, in 
fact, quite wrong, and the imagination 
that man (ahem!) had! — For instance, 
there is Alice Clough, selling Clough's 
Clinging Clothes (try to say it fast!). 
She has been married for quite some 
time. 

Show business, I've heard is bad — 
even for leading men. Maybe that is 
why "Bill" Green is seen about town so 
much. He was to play leading man in 
"The Passionate Prevaricator", form- 
erly named "Prudence's Indiscretions." 
Guess it didn't pass the censors. Any- 
way, it was never released. In the same 
picture, Alice Eldridge and Mary Hayes, 
among others, were to be bathing beau- 
ties. Miss Eldridge is teaching at Mt. 
Pleasant School, while Mary Hayes is 
expounding English to the "Freshies." 

Alberto Emerson must have changed 
his mind a bit. (humph! doesn't he 
know that's a woman's privilege?) for 
he's flying airplanes (one at a time) in 
Florida — or at least that was the last 
report. 

Arthur Davis must have grown tem- 
peramental and said, "I tank I go home, 
now" — or something, for he's no longer 
in pictures but clerking in the First 
National Stores. I guess D. Brown's 
last scenario was too much for Arthur. 
And if Daniel Brown is writing plays, 
it's secondary to his training at art 
school in the big city. 

Doris Boles, another predicted bath- 
ing beauty, must have "beautied" quite 
a bit ; anyway, she got her man. 

Elva Querze, slated to play opposite 
Green, must have been a good leading 
lady, for she's married, too. 

Elizabeth Finney was to be another 
bather, but found bathing others more 
profitable, I guess. At any rate she 
turned out to be a nurse. 



Eride Poschi has no twins as yet, 
but good times are coming and maybe 
he'll be out of school, sometime — then 
let's hope for wedding bells. In the 
meantime, she's working in the Registry 
of Deeds. 

Anna Raymond "rolled those mag- 
netic lamps" once too often (and then 
again, maybe not) and so she was 
married. Her little girl is the cutest 
thing — 

Ellis Whiting is doing his running 
for Jordan Marsh Company instead of 
in marathons. 

Charles Swift is in Springfield, Mario 
Vandini is an ice-man, Louise Lodi's 
working in Burbank's, William Downie 
is a mail-carrier, and Warren Bruce 
works at the Automotive Garage — and 
that's all for today, ladies and gentle- 
men, so far as the Class of 1927 is con- 
cerned, at least. 



Now for a bit of 1928 news : — 

Phyllis Thorn was making a portrait 
with Amedea Galvani as the model, but 
I guess she's too busy at home to finish 
it, or maybe the cat jumped into the 
paint and spoiled it — anyway, no one 
has ever seen it. 

Olga Armstrong's Muscle Factory 
must have lacked muscle because it went 
"on the rocks" before it started. Olga, 
jumped from the frying pan into the 
fire — she was married, you know — or, 
perhaps, you didn't. 

If Vincent Bernagozzi really did build 
over the whole block around Jordan's 
Hardware Store, wouldn't you think 
such a thing would have been notice- 
able? His corner store must be pretty 
small or else he rents it to Jordan's so 
he can spend more profitable moments 
with Jordan Marsh. 

Again, the prophecy was wrong — but 
this time it was Foster Sampson's fault 
— Regolo Leonardi is not a member of 
the Board of Selectmen, but a member 
of the popular Board of Unemployed. 

Adova Gambini is wise to keep with- 
in her father's employ, but give her 
time and find the right corner around 
which prosperity is hiding and maybe 
she'll have her own parlor — ice-cream 
parlor, of course! 



THE PILGRIM 



43 



Kenneth Crowell isn't president of 
the bank but maybe some day — if he's 
a real good boy — he'll be president of 
Mitchell-Thomas Company where he is 
working as a clerk. We have heard that 
big oaks from little acorns grow. 

I don't believe Pauline Raymond's 
"Learn While You Laugh" system got 
far in the schools; but someone must 
have liked it, for she got her pharmacist 
and is living happily ever after — 

Alfred Pimental didn't last long as 
Pearl Axford's campaign manager, for 
he is teaching — yes, I said teaching — 
at good old P. H. And Pearl Axf ord did 
get her own home, but as to being 
governor — you'd better ask her. He'd 
say no, anyway. 

Margaret Peterson must have tired of 
her School of Dance. At any rate, she up 
and did it, too! What, you ask? She put 
it over — got engaged, silly ! 

Helen Cohen and Caroline Rossi are 
back from Hollywood. They didn't like 
the people, or maybe they just didn't 
photograph well — Caroline works at the 
Old Colony Theatre and she was a P. G. 
— but she says the weather's too nice 
now. My guess is that she likes to sleep 
mornings. Anyhow she isn't P. G'ing 
any longer. 

Marion Douglass is not proprietress 
of the "Wampum Inn", but of her own 
home — maybe of her husband, too, I 
don't know ; — Ribella Testoni is P. G'ing 
and May Wood did get married. Frances 
Shroeder also embarked on the matri- 
monial venture, and her young son plays 
in my backyard and he loves to take his 
hat off. — And Bertha Mitchell has re- 
mained true to her word — so far — and 
is a bachelor maid. 

Now, it really is time to say — "Au 
revoir and pul-leasant dre-ums — until 
the next tium when" — 

Miriam Gifford, '33 



MEBBE IT'S PERSONAL 

WE'RE GETTING 

QF course I'm "nerts," a prevarica- 
tor, and I don't know what, but 
here are your sins and secrets, your pet 
fears and hates, and your loves (so help 
me Hannah.) 

Thinking a small, but very import- 
ant part of his role in the operetta was 
a bit ragged, Manzotti did a little 
"practicing" (at least that's what those 
concerned called it) in the wingf„ a few 
nights before the performance. As a 
witness to both performances I can read- 
ily say that the "practice" really helped. 



Bussolari, Ferri, Querze, and Fiocchi 
will gladly relate their experiences of 
Saturday, April 29, upon request. 

Fore ! Dame Rumor has given me 
every reason to believe that Mr. Fash 
(you know, the fellow on the busy 
street) has aspirations of some day be- 
coming a member of the "Hole-in-One" 
fraternity. 

Did you know that Judy Walker does 
his track training in the vicinity of 
Park Avenue? Manager's orders — you 
know. 

I'm still wondering what induced Elly 
Johnson and Roger Clark to P. G. ? 

Have you been observing Dot Testoni 
and Elsie Ottani lately? Something "on 
the make", I'd say. 

Ask Tibbetts what became of the 
flowers that were pinned on him the 
night of the operetta. 

There's no place like "Chacheeks 
Pavilion." What do you say, Roncarati? 

I can't believe it (would you believe 
it) but it's true. Tote Raymond has it 
(I don't mean that it but the other it) 
so badly that he actually salts his coffee 
and tries to drink hot dogs. 

May I suggest that Lavache move in- 
to 84 Court Street? 

"Creeper" James, what you-all been 
doing around 31 Seaview Street? 

It's a pity that more people weren't 
behind the scenes the night of the oper- 
etta to see "Bailey's Show." Ask Mrs. 
Buck or Miss Hendry. 

Incidentally, what has become of 
those charming gentlemen, Baron von 
Snoop and the Unknown Reporter? 

What would you do if someone threw 
you out of a window (seven feet from 
the ground) ? Don't tell me — go show 
Gilly Harlow. 

Another little suggestion — try getting 
some sleep for a change, Mr. Davis. 



AS OUR BOYS GO ON 

"Zana" Romano, varsity center for 
B. C. last season, received the distinc- 
tion of being rated as one of the best 
centers in the East. Good boy, "Zana." 

"Ohiefy" Armstrong starred as a 
member of the N. H. U. varsity basket- 
ball team. 

Leno Lenzi was one of the out- 
standing backs in the Bates- Yale foot- 
ball upset. Leno, playing in Bates back- 
field, was credited with the longest run 
of the game. 

"Sparky" Spath starred on the Dean 
football and basketball varsities and is 
at present a member of the undefeated 
varsity baseball team. 

Mrs. B's Little Boy 



44 



THE PILGRIM 




The editors wish to make acknowledg- 
ment of and express appreciation for 
the many papers and magazines which 
we have received this year. We hope 
that this relation with other schools will 
continue through a long period of time. 

DO YOU KNOW THAT:— 

1. "The Pilgrim" receives exchanges 
from as far northwest as Alaska, as far 
south as Virginia, and from Plymouth, 
England, and Athens, Greece? 

2. The first school paper published by 
the Port Jervis High School was "The 
Orange County School Journal" in 
1897? 

3. The Literary Club at Weymouth 
High School has been revived and is 
continuing its help for students who are 
potential college candidates? 

4. The subscription price for "Sunny 
Days", the magazine from The Ameri- 
can College for Girls in Athens, Greece, 
costs fifty drachmas a year? (Approxi- 
mately $.28 in American money.) 

5. More than a third of the students 
enrolled in the Howard High School, 
West Bridgewater, are taking the 
straight commercial course? 

6. The proceeds from the Senior 
Class Play, "The Valiant" helped make 
possible this issue of "The Pilgrim"? 

Comments and Commendations 

"The Periscope" , Carlisle High School 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania 

We enjoyed reading this well-planned 
paper and particularly liked the poetry. 



"The Echo", Canton High School 
Canton 

The literary department of your mag- 
azine is most interesting. The Exchange 

is clever. 

"The Chronicle", South Paris, Maine 

We think that some poetry would im- 
prove your magazine. 

"The Blue Owl", Attleboro High 
School, Attleboro 

This is one of the most interesting 
magazines that we receive. We always 
enjoy "The Blue Owl." 

"Abhis", Abington High Shool, Ab- 
ington 

We found many laughs in the joke 
section. 

"Little Red Schoolhouse", Athol High 
School, Athol 

We enjoyed reading "Parents Visit 
Studyland". Why not try a few more 
poems? 

Excerpts from Exchanges 

Miss Eldsley: "I wonder if I'll live to 
be a hundred." 

Mrs. Host : "Not if you remain twenty- 
three much longer." 

"Ferncliff Echo", Lee, Mass. 

"Waiter, this soup is spoiled." 
"Who told you?" 
"A little swallow." 

"The Orange Leaf", Orange, N. J. 
Headlights and lightheads meet at 
grade crossings. 

"The Climber", West Bridgewater 

"He has two wooden legs. How can he 

walk?" 
"I guess he just lumbers along." 

"The Wampatuck", Braintree 



THE PILGRIM 



45 



i 



THE ORACLE 

By the "Mastermind" 



I 



Dear Mastermind : 

I detest children ; what can I do to be 
mean to them? 

Tuffy Wuffy 

Dear Wuffy : 

Establish a chain of "Children's Free 
Saturday Night Baths." 

Mastermind 

Dear Mastermind: 

Who wrote the lines, "Breathes there 
a man with soul so dead ?" 

Ima Nutt 

Dear Nertzy : 

Author unknown. It is rumored that 
he was an individual foolish enough to 
visit Mr. Fash during one of his mild 
and mellow experiments. 

Mastermind 

P. S. If dissatisfied, consider the one 
about the man who attended the Atlan- 
tic City beauty contest and watched an 
airplane loop-the-loop while the peach- 
erinos trotted by. 

Dear Mastermind : 

I am a Sophomore boy and in love. It 
is the first time in my life that I have 
drunk from the fountain of love. I 
would be deeply grateful to you for all 
the advice you can give me concerning 
the nobler sex. 

Kent Helbit 
Dear Kent: 

Realizing the unseaworthiness of the 
craft which you're in (and not being 
a Dorothy Dix) I have compiled bits of 
advice for you graciously given by sev- 
eral eminent members of the class of 
1933 (God bless them). 

Henry Gilbert Harlow (President of 
Senior Class) : Be broadminded. 

Justin Emory Walker (Vice-President 
of Senior Class) : Always true, but 
never faithful. 

Peter "Precious" Ferioli (Treasurer 
of Senior Class) : Love her and leave her 
unless you met her while she was in the 
eighth grade. 

Joseph (Play Fiddle Play) Querze: 
See me in person. 

Warren Girard: If you have a car, 
give her the air. 

I personally never have anything to do 
with girls whatsosever, to speak of, but 
I once read in a book (never mind the 
title) that some Prince of Galavanting 
said : "Lie to a girl because she seldom 
accepts the truth. Keep her until some- 
thing better comes along." 

Mastermind 



Dear Mastermind : 

What do you consider the greatest 
folly committed by the American people 
in the year 1932? 

Lotta Noive 
Dear Noivy: 

Their failure to elect Eddie Cantor 
President of the United States. 

Mastermind 
Dear Mastermind : 

Would you be so kind as to tell me 
around just what corner prosperity is? 

Wotta Hick 
Dear Hicky : 

I was told by a fellow, who knows a 
fellow, who knows a lady, who has an 
aunt who knows a man, who knows a 
chorus girl, who knows my pal Winchell, 
that Walter says that he will find that 
corner as soon as someone puts a key- 
hole in that vicinity. Sorry, Hicky, but 
out of respect for my pal "Walla", I 
think you'll have to wait. 

Mastermind 
Dear Mastermind : 

Who has the most beautiful blue eyes 
in P. H. S.? 

Mina Blou 
Dear Mina: 

I've looked into many deep, soulful, 
beautiful, blue eyes (yes, I'm acquainted 
with Lord Byron) but never have I 
found a pair equal to those of "Cunning" 
(The North Plymouth Tornado) Rag- 
gazini. 

Mastermind 
Dear Mastermind : 

What do you consider the height of 
embarrassment? 

Wanna Lurn 
Dear Wanna : 

I consider the meeting of two eyes 
through the same keyhole, the pinnacle 
of embarrassment. 

Mastermind 
Dear Mastermind : 

How did Dot Testoni get that scar 
over her right eye? 

Eanie Meanie 
Dear Meanie: 

Considering that Dot is a very close 
friend (???) of mine, I suppose I really 
shouldn't tell, but you have come unto 
the Mastermind and he who asketh shall 
receive an answer. 

Several years ago, dear little Dot (I 
think she was a sixteenth of an inch 
shorter then) was simply "that way" 
about a dashing young fellow whose 



46 



THE PILGRIM 



name I choose to withhold for divers 
reasons. Being shy and retiring even in 
those days, Dot took it upon herself one 
day to run about the schoolyard shout- 
ing at the top of her lungs that Gable 
(we'll have to call him something for the 
story's sake) was her "fella". 

Now Gable, possessing more of the 
Tracey blood (take your pick, either Lee 
or Spencer) than Gable, decided that 
what the girl needed was a "bat'n'a 
head". So picking up a pebble about the 
size of a pigeon's egg, he, with form and 
control that would have made Lefty 
Grove green with envy, "brained" Dot 
with said pebble. 

That is the authentic story of Dot's 
ccar. Someday I will tell you the story 
of Tid Beever's scar. 

Mastermind 
Dear Mastermind: 

Where was Moses 
went out? 



when the lights 
0. Howe Dumm 



Dear Dummy: 

Parked at Plymouth Beach. 

Mastermind 
Dear Mastermind : 

Whom do you consider the most prom- 
ising member of the class of 1933? 

Mitebe Mee 
Dear Meeme : 

Ask Kenneth Tingley and find out 
why he is. 

Mastermind 



Dear Mastermind : 

After listening to Bussolari's scintil- 
lating (??) editorial entitled, "Let's 
Play Hookey" (yes, hookey was mis- 
spelled) I thought that there might be 
a little more behind the whole affair 
than appears on the surface. Can you 
enlighten me upon this subject? 

Theep Dinker 
Dear Dinkey: 

You are right. There is more behind 
this escapade than appears on the sur- 
face. Let me say that I, the Master- 
mind, am well qualified to tell you that 
the only reason that Bussolari did not 
join the "Hole-In-One" fraternity is 
that a set of left-handed golf clubs could 
not be located. 

Mastermind 

Dear Mastermind: 

I am terribly bored by everything. 
Can you tell me how and where to find 
real adventure and trouble? 

Ham Bishus 
Dear Porky : 

Try joining either some, or all, (Lord 
help you if you do) of these noble organ- 
izations: the "Oriole A. C", "South 
Shore Recreation Association", and the 
exclusive "Hole-In-One" fraternity. 

For further information see Maxie 
Fiocchi or some of the "boys". 

Mastermind 

INNAUOIGNOB, '33 




"THE VALIANT" 
Left to Right: Standing. Howard Sherman, Robert Martin, George Riddell, Geno Ferri 
Seated : Alvin Borgeson, Lorftta Smith 



THE PILGRIM 



47 





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Victoria Brewer, '33 



48 



THE PILGRIM 




Not So Funny! 

Senior: "Why is an empty purse always the 
same?" 

Freshman: "Well, why is an empty purse 
always the same?" 

Senior: "Because you can't see any change 
in it." 



Sort of Shell Game 

"Well, Ted, what are you doing around this 
part of the country?" 

"Oh, just getting the lay of the land." 
"A sort of business scout?" 
"No, an egg collector." 



And Anyway, What's a Book or Two 

Freshie: "Say, mister, hold these books a 
minute." 

Principal: "Little boy, don't you know I am 
principal of this school?" 

Freshie: "Oh! That's all right, you look 
honest." 



Knowledge Is Power 

Tommy was fond of squeezing tooth paste 
out of his shiny new tube. His mother, finding 
it necessary to limit the amount to the purpose 
in view, warned him one morning not to take 
too much. 

"How much may I take?" asked Tommy. 

"Oh, a little bit, about the size of a bean." 

Tommy gave the tube a tremendous pinch 
and out shot a long ribbon of paste. 

"Tommy!" exclaimed his mother. "Do you 
wish to be punished? Is that the size of a 
bean?" 

"Sure. Mom," said Tommy. "This is a string 
bean." 



Risky 

If you go around handling people without 
gloves, it is only a matter of time before you 
tackle a live wire. 



Cynic 

Teacher: "If you subtract 14 from 116, 
what's the difference?" 

Johnny: "Yeah, I think it's a lot of foolish- 
ness, too." 



Thrift Argument 

"Tommy, isn't it rather extravagant to eat 
both butter and jam on your bread at the same 
time ? " 

"Oh, no, Mother. It's economy. You see the 
same piece of bread does for both." 



Truth Above All 

Boy: "No, Mister, I don't want to sell this 
trout." 

Angler: "Well, just let me measure him so 
that I can truly say how big the trout was that 
got away from me." 



Bedtime Story 
He: "When I woke up this morning, I found 
all the bedclothes wound tightly around me." 
She: "My, you must have slept like a top." 



Sins of His Father 

Ping: "They say stupidity can be inherited." 
Pong: "That's no way to talk about your 
parents." 



It Only Goes to Show 

"Lady," said the beggar, "could you gimme 
a quarter to get where me family is ? " 

"Certainly, my poor man," she replied, 
"here's a quarter. Where is your family?" 

And as he edged away he answered, "At 
de movies." 



She Wouldn't Flinch 

He: "What would you do if I kissed you?" 
She: "I never meet an emergency before it 
arises." 

He: "And what if one arose?" 
She: "I'd meet it face to face." 



Simple, Isn't It? 

Motor Cop (to professor of mathematics) : 
"So you saw the accident, sir. What was the 
number of the car that knocked this man 
down ? " 

Professor: "I am afraid I've forgotten it. 
But I remember noticing that if it were mul- 
tiplied by fifty, the cube root of the product 
would be equal to the sum of the digits re- 
versed." 



THE PILGRIM 



49 



SENIORS, ARE YOU READY? 

Of course you are all looking forward to graduation. 
This is the occasion above all others when you must look your best. 

Come in and visit us. 

Let us show you our exceptionally fine offerings in 

clothing and furnishings especially selected 

for graduation wear. 

You will find them styled to the minute and 
popularly priced. 

PURITAN CLOTHING COMPANY 



'The Style Store of Plymouth" 



56 Main Street 



Plymouth, Mass. 



M. D. Costa's Fruit Store 

A. J. VECCHI, Prop. 

"The Home of Good Fruit" 

40 Court Street Tel. 669 

Free Delivery 

JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Established Since 1825 

"Trade Here with Confidence" 

Hardware, Paints, Plumbing, Heating, 
and Sheet Metal Work 



Compliments of 
W. L. MERRILL, M. D. 

Compliments of 
DR. L. B. HAYDEN, M. D. 



Compliments of 



DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN 



When There Is Better Work 
Done, We Will Do It 

JOHN H. GOVI 

Tailor 
Main St., Plymouth 

PLYMOUTH BAKING CO. 

Bread, Pies, and Cakes 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Plymouth 



20 Market Street 

Tel 



255-M 



ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

Transparent Water Colors 

India Ink, black and colors 

Brushes and Outfit Boxes 

Oil and Water Colors 

Sketching Blocks 

Drawing Papers 

A. S. BURBANK 

Pilgrim Book and Art Shop 



50 



THE PILGRIM 




THE PILGRIM 



51 



NORTHEASTERN 

UNIVERSITY 




THE 
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



In co-operation with engineer- 
ing firms, offers curricula leading 
to the Bachelor of Science degree 
in the following branches of en- 
gineering: 

Civil Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 



DAY DIVISION 

THE 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 



Co-operating with business 
firms, offers courses leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in the following fields of business: 

Accounting 
Banking and Finance 
Business Management 



The Co-operative Plan of training enables the student to combine 
theory with two years of practice and makes it possible for him to 
earn his tuition and a part of his other school expenses. 

For catalog or any further information write to: 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Boston, Massachusetts 

MILTON J. SCHLAGENHAUF, Director of Admissions 



52 



THE PILGRIM 



Burdett College 



Burdett Training 

prepares tor sales, credit, collec- 
tion, accounting, junior execu- 
tive, secretarial, and other 
business and office positions. 
Individual attention. College 
grade instruction. Separate 
courses for men and women. 
Previous commercial training 
not required for entrance. 

Burdett Statistics 

The past school year: Graduating 
class, Boston, 421; Lynn, 145. 
88 different universities and col- 
leges in attendance. Employment 
calls (Boston and Lynn) total 
1208; positions filled, 774. 




BUSINESS 

COURSES 

Business Administration, 
Accounting, 
Executive Secretarial, 
Stenographic Secretarial, 
Stenographic^ Business, 
Bookkeeping, Finishing. 

SUMMER sessions begin JULY 3. 
FALL sessions begin SEPTEMBER 5. 
Catalogue on request. 



156 STUART STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

HANcock 6300 






COMPLIMENTS OF 



BUTTNEE COMPANY 



^^^^•^^•^^■^^■^^■^^^^-^^.^^\^^.^^^^^^-^^.^^,^-.^^s^^s^- a^ -.*■ ■ ^ -.i - .*■ .^ ^ ^- .» ^ ^ ^ ■ .» - ^. i ^ i ^ ^ ^ 'fc ■%%.'■%. ^W" ■%.%.■%. -V ^. "^. ^. fc "V. -W %.%. *^. ■%. %. 

HIGH SCHOOL BOYS TAKE NOTICE 

If your Suits, Hats, Shirts and Ties 

Are not becoming to you, 

You ought to "becoming" to us 

MORSE and SHERMAN STORE 

WM. J. SHARKEY 



Court Street 



Plymouth 



THE PILGRIM 



53 



I 

j graduation Photographs 


1 That Satisfy 


\ JARED GARDNER 


| Tel. 9992-M Plymouth 


I BENJAMIN D. LORING 




1 DIAMONDS - WATCHES - 
j JEWELRY - SILVERWARE 


STEVENS THE FLORIST 


! GIFTS AND CLOCKS I 

I Fine Repairing a Specialty 


Flowers for Graduation 


' 28 Main Street Plymouth, Mass. 




| H. A. BRADFORD 


VAPURE 


' 1 Warren Avenue 




| Distributor for 
\ H. P. Hood & Sons 


Put a few drops on your handker- 
chief and inhale for HEAD COLDS 


j S. S. Pierce Specialties 


and CATARRH 


I Birdseye Frosted Foods 




| Tel. 1298-W 


BEMIS DRUG CO. 


\ Compliments of 


Bring Your Sick Shoes 
to the 




PLYMOUTH 


| DR. A. L. DOUGLAS 


SHOE HOSPITAL 




We Guarantee Our Work 


j Compliments of 


PLYMOUTH ROCK 
HARDWARE CO. 


1 GRAY THE CLEANER 


62 Court Street Tel. 951 




Paint Headquarters 


{ Compliments 


1 (§15 (Kolottg Kjamt&rij 


| of Pi 


ltttmtth 



54 



THE PILGRIM 



Compliments of 



GAMBINI'S 



Compliments of 



DR. J. F. TAYLOR 



BLISS HARDWARE CO., Inc. 

Plumbing Sheet Metal Work 

Heating 
Painting Supplies 

Oil Burning Equipments 

JOE PIOPPI'S 

One Price Ladies' Shoe Dept. 

£2.95 
Men's Shoes £2.95-^3.95-^4.95 

HERFF-JONES COMPANY 

Indianapolis, Indiana 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS 

of 

SCHOOL AND COLLEGE JEWELRY, 

COMMENCEMENT ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CUPS, MEDALS AND TROPHIES 

Jewelers to Plymouth High School 

H. E. SULLIVAN 
New England Representative 



FRANK L. BAILEY 

Optometrist and Optician 

17 Court St. 
Russell Bldg., Plymouth 

ON THE RADIO 
Enna Jettick Shoes for Ladies 

Franklin Shoes for Men 
EDDIE'S SHOE SYSTEM 

18 Main Street 

Edward Hand, Mgr. 
W. N. SNOW &, SON 

FURNITURE, RUGS, SHADES 
and LINOLEUM 

7-9 Town Square Plymouth, Mass. 

Telephone 709 

MAYFLOWER DYE HOUSE 

KOBLANTZ BROS. 

Next to Park Theatre 

Cleansing — Dyeing — Pressing 

Phone 1240— Work Called For and Delivered 

TUTORING 

Members of P. H. S. faculty re- 
maining in Plymouth for the summer 
are prepared to tutor in many high 
school subjects. 

Call Mr. Wayne M. Shipman, Prin- 
cipal, for further information. 



ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER 



PATRONIZE OUR ADVERTISERS. 



THE PILGRIM 



55 



Are You 
PROGRESSING 
with the 
Century? 



Let ELECTRICITY 
Be Your Servant 



PLYMOUTH 
ELECTRIC LIGHT CO. 



"The Home of Service" 



THE PILGRIM 



Autngntpljis 

(tafia of 1333